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Retailers, consumers and prices

Rockin’ with AC/DC…even if you don’t know who they are

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black.JPGWhen Wal-Mart noticed its AC/DC  t-shirts were among some of its best-selling, the world’s biggest retailer realized some type of partnership with the rock band might make sense.

Now, as AC/DC prepares for the Oct 20 launch of its latest album, that partnership is coming to life — it goes far beyond shirts.

Wal-Mart, which was chosen by the band to exclusively sell the “Black Ice” album in its stores in the U.S., is setting up ”Rock Again AC/DC Stores” inside all of its 3,500 Walmart locations. They will be stocked with the new album, AC/DC clothes, DVDs, the band’s earlier albums, games, and an area to try out the new AC/DC Rock Band video game.

Wal-Mart is also making its presence known in Manhattan, an island currently Wal-Mart free. On Friday, it parked its ”Black Ice” truck in Times Square and set up  a stage so passers-by could try out the new AC/DC Rock Band video game.

Wal-Mart takes Manhattan?

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acdc.jpgWal-Mart is joining the Manhattan pop-up brigade.
 
Starting this week in New York City, the retailer will put up a temporary store in Times Square and have a truck roving around the city to celebrate the launch of AC/DC’s new album. 
 
The rock band has chosen to exclusively sell its latest album, Black Ice, through the discount retailer in the United States, and Wal-Mart will also exclusively sell the AC/DC Live: Rock Band Track Pack video game.
 
This week, AC/DC fans — and curious onlookers — can visit the Black Ice truck to listen to the AC/DC album in advance of its release on Oct 20.
 
On Saturday night, at the Times Square MTV store, Wal-Mart and MTV will unveil the “AC/DC Rock Band store” and sell the first copies of the new album.
 
Wal-Mart joins a long list of retailers who have stormed the Big Apple,  setting up pop-up stores on an island where they have no permanent location.
 
Last month, Target set up temporary “bodegas” in Manhattan to show off its line of designer merchandise.

 (Reuters photo)

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