Entrepreneurial

Summer camp, with a twist

July 30, 2009

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We’ve all heard of summer camp, boot camp, even fat camp. But how about a camp for young women with a knack for business?

That’s the idea behind Girls Inc. Corporate Camp for Entrepreneurs, a week-long workshop held earlier this month in New York City for 20 girls between the ages of 15 and 18.

Now in its fourth year, the camp hand-picked its attendees from a pool of 70 applicants across the U.S. who competed in teams with like-minded young women to come up with an original business product or service, complete with a viable business plan. (Think: The Apprentice, minus Donald Trump and the TV crew.)

The resulting ideas were certainly unique. In a nod to eco-conscious consumerism, Team “Water Girls” came up with a calendar that monitors water usage with the aim of helping customers conserve and save money. (Watch their presentation here.) “Teenage Touch” presented a mini-service salon offering a range of beauty services aimed at girls. The young women pictured above created “Oh!Zone”,  a 5-in-1 game aimed at getting adults and teen girls to talk about touchy issues like health and self-esteem.

The winners were treated to 7 days of business-building tips and presentations from small biz owners and volunteers from Goldman Sachs Community TeamWorks with the goal of developing the country’s next entrepreneurial gurus.

“By learning firsthand how women are successful in the traditionally male-dominated business world, they’re able to envision themselves as leaders in business or any career they pursue,” Girls Inc. President Joyce Roché told Reuters.

Are we doing enough to encourage entrepreneurialism in young people? Tell us what you think below.

Caption: The Memphis team of Girls Inc. prepares for its presentation of Oh!Zone. REUTERS/Handout/Duffy-Marie Arnoult Photography

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Go Girls Inc! This is awesome.

Posted by Evelyn Smith | Report as abusive
 

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