Entrepreneurial

Rate this innovation: The treadmill bike

April 29, 2010

bike1Love to run outside, but hate getting your feet dirty? Well you’re in luck. Entrepreneur Brent Curry has bolted a treadmill onto a bike frame and created a “treadmill bike”.

The bike has no electronic parts and runs entirely on human momentum. As the rider walks on the treadmill, the belt butts up against the rear wheel propelling the bike forward.

It’s a novel design – and when Curry took the bikes out for a spin with Reuters, numerous people asked where they could buy one.  So far, he only sells his bikes online through his company The Bicycle Forest.

The price for the treadmill bike?  $2,500.

Curry says he has had a few serious inquiries, but no one has actually purchased a treadmill bike. And with only two models in stock – his original prototype and a slightly modified version – if someone did show up with cash in hand, Curry would be in a tight spot.

Instead, he prefers to rent out his bikes to curious locals and visitors to his shop in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada.

A mechanical engineer by trade, Curry has built bikes from couches, bikes that look like cars and a “hula bike” that doesn’t even have pedals. But Curry’s bread-and-butter is a custom bicycle design program he created called BikeCAD Pro, which he sells to bicycle manufacturers and bike shops.

In 2009, Curry’s software sales, combined with a small rental income, totaled about $50,000.

What do you think? If Curry mass produced the treadmill bike, do you think he could go from meager earnings to millionaire?

Comments
One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

At first glance I say it is great, but anyone that has ever ran with a stroller knows that keeping your hands on something to steer it throws your balance off and makes running awkward.

Posted by Storiale | Report as abusive
 

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