Comments on: 5 lessons businesses can learn from WikiLeaks http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/2010/12/13/5-lessons-businesses-can-learn-from-wikileaks/ Grow your own Thu, 26 Mar 2015 12:32:24 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: minipaws http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/2010/12/13/5-lessons-businesses-can-learn-from-wikileaks/comment-page-1/#comment-3620 Fri, 11 Feb 2011 11:35:06 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/?p=3384#comment-3620 6. All of our governments are a bunch of liars!

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By: rseer http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/2010/12/13/5-lessons-businesses-can-learn-from-wikileaks/comment-page-1/#comment-3257 Wed, 19 Jan 2011 17:07:08 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/?p=3384#comment-3257 I second the responder who said to just do the right thing. Doing the wrong thing – defined as manipulations that deprive others of their innate power of self-determination – will *inevitably* create resentment and create and empower enemies who will turn the tables by exposing your manipulations.

As a result, I strongly disagree with many of the points in this article. Sure, secure your intellectual property and sensitive personal data both with active and passive measures, as well as insurance. But ultimately, with WikiLeaks, none of THAT was released. Instead it was all about real or perceived malfeasance.

So the article’s advice on actively planning to contain damaging information is inane. Why not simply avoid the behaviors that create it in the first place? It doesn’t take a lot of “maturity” in your staff for them to realize you’re manipulating and resent it. In fact, what we’re seeing with WikiLeaks is a new definition of “maturity” in which manipulations are not acceptable.

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By: Marlowe3488 http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/2010/12/13/5-lessons-businesses-can-learn-from-wikileaks/comment-page-1/#comment-2894 Tue, 14 Dec 2010 21:29:27 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/?p=3384#comment-2894 “What are the financial penalties that could be levied?” Hey you know what, call me an idealist, but how about instead of asking that question DON’T BREAK THE LAW IN THE FIRST PLACE! Then you won’t have to worry about any penalties being levied. Seriously this whole article reads like an enabler telling heroin addicts where to get their fix when it should be telling them to stop doing heroin. I’m with JackMack on this one, I understand that trade secrets are an issue and that intellectual property should be protected for the sake of a business, but a good deal of PR issues would be preemptively mitigated if you’re just honest and have nothing to hide. This article reminds me of the South Park episode where the characters’ families left the Catholic Church in the wake of the priest abuse scandals and so the Vatican had a meeting to discuss not how to put a stop to the abuse, but how to put a stop to the victims coming forward with their stories.

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By: Outsider http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/2010/12/13/5-lessons-businesses-can-learn-from-wikileaks/comment-page-1/#comment-2893 Tue, 14 Dec 2010 21:26:47 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/?p=3384#comment-2893 The truth is that no information, no matter what media it is on, is 100% secure. By now, everyone should know that. You can do what you can to make it more secure than it was, but you will never get to 100%.

So be ready when it gets out. That’s all you can really do.

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By: duodave http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/2010/12/13/5-lessons-businesses-can-learn-from-wikileaks/comment-page-1/#comment-2892 Tue, 14 Dec 2010 20:22:10 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/?p=3384#comment-2892 Speaking of phones, text messaging business information, leaks or even gossip can be a bad thing. Anyone can have phone records seized with a warrant and read anything defamatory that could have been said in text messages. Of course, you could get wiretapped or if you’re really paranoid there’s the issue of hacking a cell phone via bluetooth, but those are probably less of an issue than getting your texts seized or intercepted.

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By: JackMack http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/2010/12/13/5-lessons-businesses-can-learn-from-wikileaks/comment-page-1/#comment-2890 Tue, 14 Dec 2010 19:30:22 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/?p=3384#comment-2890 Perhaps the single most important lesson for managers is actually this: do the right thing. If you do the right thing consistently, then data and information breaches come with fewer consequences. Sure, there are trade secrets that, if released, can cause serious harm to a business, and managers need to take appropriate steps to keep these secure. The real danger to most businesses, however, isn’t the exposure of trade secrets but the exposure of deliberate malfeasance.

Do the right thing, and that danger disappears altogether. Simple. Not necessarily easy, but amazingly simple and completely effective.

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By: lexus http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/2010/12/13/5-lessons-businesses-can-learn-from-wikileaks/comment-page-1/#comment-2879 Tue, 14 Dec 2010 05:34:53 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/small-business/?p=3384#comment-2879 If you’re going to say something nasty about a third paty to a colleague do it on the phone. Business plans should never be left on the computer after they’re finalized; put them on paper, lock them in the vault, and WIPE the hard drives (don’t just delete the files – the information will still be there, easily reclaimed). I’ve been in the compter industry since the 1960s and I haven’t found a computer yet that can’t be hacked. Above all, don’t put the financial data on a network if at all possible, and for the business’s sake, don’t ever connect it to the internet. If you must transmit such data remotely do it over a secure leased line, encrypted.

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