Entrepreneurial

Exclusive: Fewer small businesses shopping for credit: PayNet

June 6, 2011

When the financial crisis hit, panicked small businesses were scrambling to find credit. Nearly three years later it’s a much different story.

The level of credit shopping – when a borrower seeks a loan or lease from more than one lender – by small businesses has fallen nearly 30 percent since September 2008, according to new data released by PayNet Inc and it may lead lenders to offer better terms said William Phelan, PayNet’s president and founder.

“It indicates that it’s not a very competitive market right now,” said Phelan, whose Skokie, Illinois-based company released the data as part of the launch of its new Credit Shopping Indicator, which measures the number of lenders a borrower shops for business credit. “In 2008 you would have expected it to be high because of the recession and the lack of availability of credit.”

Phelan said back then the indicator registered 118 – a record – and far above pre-recessionary levels in January 2005, when it sat at 100 – the point at which a borrower typically shops for credit at more than one bank. Today it stands at 84.

This dip is actually good news for small businesses, who should take the opportunity to ask for better loan terms from lenders, said Phelan.

“It just shows that if they could spend more time maybe going to one or two extra banks, they might get better terms,” he said, noting the current level of credit shopping indicates a degree of comfort on behalf of borrowers with their banks. “Clearly if the small business is shopping less they’re satisfied with their current provider more. It’s a pretty good indication that customer service levels have improved much since 2008.”

Phelan said the Credit Shopping Indicator will likely be offered on a quarterly basis to PayNet clients, which include more than 250 leading U.S. capital equipment lenders.

“Our customers are using it to gauge whether their customer service is getting better or worse.”

Comments
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Mr. Phelan is obviously not well informed. The main reason for the fall in credit applications is that many small businesses have collapsed by now and thus need no more credit.

Further, I would suggest that Mr. Phelan actually bothers to shop for credit himself to experience what happens if you walk into a bank and “ask for better credit terms”.

I am surprised that Reuters is consulting with Mr. Phelan who is obviously only a paper tiger and has no idea of what is happening outside his office.

Posted by Claudius1090 | Report as abusive
 

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