Entrepreneurial

Entrepreneur helps fight cancer with “hedge fund”

By John Peabody
August 7, 2012

A tree nursery owner in Belgium has set up a nationwide recycling program to collect hedge trimmings used for cancer-fighting drugs.

from Felix Salmon:

Annals of dubious statistics, crowdfunding edition

By Felix Salmon
July 27, 2012

Are crowdfunding statistics the new counterfeiting statistics? Certainly they seem to have become a meme. If you know that crowdfunding is a big deal, it's probably because you read all about it in TechCrunch, in May ("these portals raised $1.5 billion and successfully funded more than 1 million campaigns in 2011"), USA Today, a few weeks later ("About $1.5 billion was raised in 2011 by about 450 crowd-sourcing Internet sites worldwide"), or maybe the Economist, a week after that ("$2.8 billion will be raised worldwide this year, up from $1.5 billion in 2011"). More recently, Forbes upped the ante even further: "This year alone, an estimated $3.2 billion dollars is expected to be raised through donation-based crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter".

IDEO’s Tom Hulme on visualizing your business model

By John Peabody
July 23, 2012

In this video, Tom Hulme, Design Director at IDEO and founder of OpenIDEO, introduces a tool that IDEO and HackFWD designed to help founders design and build startups. Although the focus is on tech startups, non-tech entrepreneurs will likely find some applicable lessons from Hulme’s 12-minute talk, including strategies to identify the “backbone of your business,” marketing and how to refine your business model.

Q & A with Greg Damerow, athlete and adaptive bicycle builder

By John Peabody
July 9, 2012

Greg Damerow is an athlete and small business owner. Damerow, based in Ohio, is the owner of Personalized Cycling Alternatives, which builds custom adaptive bicycles. He was attracted to handcycling after he became ill with ankylosing spondylitis, a severe form of arthritis that affects the body’s joints. The Hartford recently awarded Damerow with a small business grant, and he spoke with Reuters about competing and running a small business.

Tech Tonic checks in with HealthTap

By John Peabody
June 28, 2012

HealthTap wants to make visits to the doctor’s office a thing of the past. Anthony De Rosa talks with HealthTap founder Ron Goodman about his new app that allows users to ask doctors questions without ever leaving home. But is less face time actually a good thing?

As video chat becomes easier, text chats still rule

By John Peabody
June 26, 2012

Sean Parker and Google are both pushing group video chat products pretty hard right now. Parker’s latest product is Airtime, and Google’s is the Google+ Hangout. The idea, it seems, is that video conference calls offer a better, more social experience.

from Paul Smalera:

Brad Feld’s four ingredients for thriving startup cities

June 26, 2012

BOULDER, Colo. -- One of the most resonant talks I heard at last week's Big Boulder conference was also one of the shortest. In about twenty minutes, Brad Feld, who is without exaggeration the godfather to the Boulder startup community, explained exactly why it is that Boulder feels like a town on the verge, and why it's teeming with startups. A lot of it has to do with Feld himself.

from Paul Smalera:

Startups are big in Boulder, but where are the tech billionaires?

June 20, 2012

"I'm not interested in working on this unless it's going to be a multi-billion dollar idea. If I thought this would be a hundred million dollar company -- what's the point?" - Anonymous entreprerneur discussing his startup. Overheard in front of Ozo Coffee, Boulder, CO.

from Felix Salmon:

Why Kickstarter’s great for tax revenues

By Felix Salmon
June 18, 2012

Matt Yglesias has a very odd piece at Slate entitled "The Kickstarter Recession". In a nutshell, he seems to think that a crowdfunded economy would run on less money than the current economy, and therefore produce less in the way of much-needed tax revenues. He's wrong on both counts, I think.

from The Great Debate:

‘The only crime that I committed’

By DW Gibson
June 13, 2012

Editor’s note: This week, Reuters Opinion is publishing five excerpts – one each day – from D.W. Gibson’s new book, Not Working, an oral history of the recession. Gibson spent months traveling across America talking to people who had been laid off.