Entrepreneurial

Startup adds Hollywood flare to small business videos

Small businesses have been fast to tap social media platforms like Facebook, but their efforts to provide compelling video about their products and services have fallen short.

That’s the view of L.A.-based entrepreneur and media attorney Sam Rogoway, who is launching Near Networks, a national video service to improve those efforts, while keeping production within the budgets of many local companies.

“We saw this growth in local content and video had not caught up,” said Rogoway, 32. “Given how production costs have dropped, we thought there would be an opportunity to develop not commercials for local business, but real programming.”

Near Networks has developed a system of freelance videographers around the country who are available to shoot documentary-style video on location at restaurants (see video below of L.A.’s Tavern Restaurant), retailers, spas and other small businesses. The footage is then sent to L.A. for editing by a small staff production team.

“They shoot the video in the business after we’ve done a lot of pre-production work,” said Rogoway, noting that on the Internet documentary-style content is more compelling than traditional commercials. “(Businesses) know what to expect.”

from MediaFile:

Cloud-gaming service OnLive opens up

OnLive, the "cloud-based" gaming service that generated plenty of interest when it was announced in May, is opening itself up.

The company is aiming to challenge game console makers Nintendo, Microsoft and Sony with a bold and ambitious service: on-demand, lag-free access to graphically rich games, which can be played on any TV and nearly any PC, even budget netbooks.

Analysts say such a product could fundamentally change the economics of the multibillion dollar video game industry. The only question is how well OnLive works, and some have expressed skepticism. Since its splashy introduction, little has been heard from the company, which was busy testing its service internally and installing servers in its data centers to handle traffic. OnLive delivers games run on servers in the cloud, rather than locally on a PC or a console.

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