Entrepreneurial

From a notebook to launching a startup

shane mac– Shane Mac is the co-founder of online job recruitment startup Hello There. He is also the director of marketing at Zaarly and formerly spearheaded marketing at Gist (acquired by RIM). This is an edited version of the original article that appeared on Quick Sprout. The views expressed are his own. –

About a year ago, I sat in a coffee shop pitching a new idea to one of the founders of Startup Weekend, Clint Nelson. Never would I have predicted that this one meeting would have such an impact on the next year of my life.

The entire concept was all on one page of my notebook: sketches, pricing models, tag lines and even people I should sell it to. I’ve put every idea from notes, books, speeches, and product sketches in an indexed notebook since I read a post by Tim Ferriss two years ago.

This is my best effort to share what it takes to get a (bootstrapped) startup off the ground, while also having a fulltime job. We launched three months ago, and I’m ecstatic. Here are the ups, downs, the good and the bad: Shane Macs original notes that spawned his startup Hello There. Photo courtesy of Quicksprout.com

Shane Mac's original notes that spawned his startup Hello There. Photo courtesy of Quicksprout.com

Common budget mistakes for tech startups

A call centre personnel uses a calculator as she answers a call from a investor at an online brokerage company in Tokyo October 23, 2008. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao

A call center employee uses a calculator in Tokyo. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao

– Ed Buchholz is the co-founder and CEO of 60mo, a cloud-based financial services company catering to small business owners. The views expressed are his own. –

Most everyone is familiar with the cliché: more money, more problems. But what if the problem is money?

Keeping your tech startup solvent requires the avoidance of several common budget mistakes. A budget or lack thereof can make or break a startup. Keep your overhead intact by doing the following:

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