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Is Wolfsburg’s Magath living in denial?

March 23, 2009

Wolfsburg coach Felix Magath was asked two weeks ago, after his team won their fifth consecutive league match, whether they could become German champions

“If we win all our 11 remaining fixtures then we can be champions,” he told the reporter with a hint of sarcasm. “But we are not title contenders, let’s make this clear,” he quickly added.

Two weeks later Wolfsburg have extended their winning streak to seven matches, sitting comfortably a point behind league leaders Hertha Berlin.

But even after this weekend’s 3-0 win against Arminia Bielefeld, Magath is still not satisfied.

“This result does not reflect the match,” he said. “We allowed Arminia far too many chances. We did not play well and were lucky to get away with a win.”

It has become a running joke in Germany that even if Wolfsburg win the Bundesliga, Magath will still be complaining afterwards.

Wolfsburg are going into the final stretch of the championship in mint condition. They have hardly any injuries while strikers Edin Dzeko and Grafite are in amazing form.

This could be down to Magath’s notorious fitness regime which some players have compared to torture.

Midfielder Christian Gentner, who joined from Stuttgart in 2007, admitted life was harder at Wolfsburg. But when you watch them play, Magath’s side make it look easy, attacking for 90 minutes especially when the opponents are running out of breath after 75.

So champions or not, they must be doing something right, Felix?

PHOTO: Wolfsburg coach Felix Magath arrives for their German Cup quarter-final match against Werder Bremen, March 4, 2009. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke

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