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Final tragedy for Robert Enke

November 10, 2009

Germany and Hanover 96 goalkeeper Robert Enke has died after being hit by a train in an apparent suicide, local police said on Tuesday.

“First indications point to suicide,” a media officer for the Niedersachsen police told Reuters before adding that Enke’s body was found at a train crossing some 25-km northeast of Hanover.

The German soccer federation (DFB) said in a statement: “The German team has learned of the death of Robert Enke with great shock.”

His two-year-old daughter died of a heart ailment in 2006.

PHOTO: Germany’s goalkeeper Robert Enke gestures during his team’s World Cup 2010 qualifying soccer match against Liechtenstein in Vaduz September 6, 2008. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Comments

Can’t quite believe this terrible, awful news. As a player he was a great professional, for a while the pick of a very good bunch of German goalkeepers, and the sad death of his daughter touched the whole country.

Posted by Kevin Fylan | Report as abusive
 

I really cannot believe it when I first learned the news. He was for me, Jens Lehmann’s permanent successor in the German national team. And now he is gone.Condolences to his family.

 

Жаль, очень жаль.Россия скорбит вместе.R.I.P.

Posted by Aleksandr | Report as abusive
 

Suicide is something I could never understand. No matter how bad things are, I never felt the desire. But that is just me. I guess he felt that he no longer wanted to live… he has that choice. This is terrible for his family.what a tragedy. I will never understand suicide.

 

Ruhe in Frieden Robert Enke

Posted by Christopher P | Report as abusive
 

Chris R, I hope you never get depression my friend. Only then will you see how dark your life will become. You are lucky that you have not yet been so low.R.I.P. Robert Enke.

Posted by Peter | Report as abusive
 

Anyone who prescribes experimental drugs for those whom they are treating for “depression” should ask themselves if the compensation they receive from the drug companies who they truly work for is sufficient to outweigh what should be in their conscience after hearing that one of their “patients” died of suicide (after or during their “treatment”). It is common knowledge that many unscrupulous drug companies have compensated many unscrupulous “doctors” for prescribing their product to defenseless patients who trusted their lives to them.

Posted by John Culhane | Report as abusive
 

The sad aspect pertains to the fact that professional players in soccer, hockey, basketball, and baseball are considered by the public and among themselves as “strong or macho” [men don't cry or admit any flaws or medical condition] because it is seen or interpreted as a sign of weakness. There is a high need for education by sport organizations and clubs! Why does a tragic incident have to occur before leadership in these sports begins to act? There should have been prevention – not reaction. In addition, professional athletes are seen as ‘property” being traded or ‘cut’ if they do not perform. Coaches seldom know their players in closer interaction to be able to detect any problem. As an amateur elite coach I can look at my athletes walking through the door and ‘spot’ different behavior, which I am able to do because of two reasons: 1) continued coach education in sport psychology and 2) daily close interaction with my team members. DFB and Hannover both have failed in this case! By the way, education should also include wives or girlfriends because many are not knowledgeable or experienced enough in detecting medical conditions!

Posted by Monika Schloder | Report as abusive
 

Enke was a hero and 1 of da best keepers in da world!!! I miss a man like him because i wanted 2 see him in SA next year

Posted by Piet | Report as abusive
 

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