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Faithless Ferguson sounds a familiar tone (Updates with ban)

November 12, 2009

Thursday update: Nothing to do with this incident, of course, but worth noting that Ferguson has been banished to the stands, receiving a two-match ban and a fine of 20,000 quid for the comments he made about Alan Wiley in October.

So, the FA has decided to get tough with the United boss. Are they right to do it? Read the full story here.

You might think Alex Ferguson would have realised, after half a century in the professional game, that the view from the manager’s dug-out is rarely objective or entirely accurate.

And if a referee does happen to make a mistake, which he is bound to do in the high-speed hurly-burly of a Premier League match, the Scot might also have come to the conclusion that venting your spleen at the powerless fourth official is a waste of everybody’s time.

But no, it seems not. Week after week, month after month, season after season, barely a match passes without Ferguson complaining about something that didn’t go United’s way.

On Sunday, when he might have been questioning his decision to play only one striker in a cautious approach to the showdown with Chelsea or berating his walkabout defence for failing to defend the key free kick, he found three reasons why John Terry’s goal should not have stood.

The initial foul on Ashley Cole by Darren Fletcher should not have been given, he said. Wes Brown was impeded in trying to defend the subsequent Frank Lampard free kick and Didier Drogba was offside and obscuring Edwin van der Sar’s view of the ball when it went in.

Of the hat-trick, the initial one appeared to have the most merit but any number of aggressive tackles are deemed fouls these days and Cristiano Ronaldo used to benefit as much if not more than anyone else in that regard.

The marginal contact between Drogba and Brown is also small beer in the current climate where wrestling in the box ahead of free kicks and corners has become an established part of the game. Rest assured that when Steve Bruce was patrolling the centre of United’s defence he would not have allowed himself to so easily be taken out of the game at a vital moment.

TV replays were inconclusive over Drogba’s position and, even if all three moans were justified, people have surely just stopped listening.

“You lose faith in refereeing sometimes, that’s the way the players are talking in there — it was a bad one,” he said, with Wayne Rooney chipping in by apparently mouthing “12 men” at a TV camera as he trudged off at the end.

PHOTO: Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson reacts during their English Premier League soccer match against Chelsea at Stamford Bridge in London November 8, 2009. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh

Comments

I actually thought Ferguson had it about right this time. They were unlucky with the goal and very unlucky to lose a match they dominated. I get your point, still. He’s like the boy who cried wolf.

Posted by Nutsville | Report as abusive
 
 

It is usual practice for Ferguson to always cry wolf on officiating when its not in his favor, in the same match, he didnt see the kind of kungfu strike that Evans gave Drogba, but Drogba was booked instead. I think old age is telling on the man.

Posted by olayinka | Report as abusive
 

Drogba is a master actor and he’s footballing behaviour stinks to say the least.He embarrisses all african footballers.J.Evans jumped to defend and I think he was not carded because he didnt lash out.Drogba made a meal of it & acted like he was in convultions or being electrocuted or something.I feel he should have been Red Carded for that.If ever I stop watching football it will be due to behaviour like that.There aint no way football should go down the route wrestling went.Drogba should open and acting academy in his his naive land.Hes souring football.Chelsea prepared a slow moving pitch to counter uniteds exiting attacking football.Antics like that of drogba was the only thing then required to derail United mental state

Posted by Tim | Report as abusive
 

Tim, i dont think you watched the match closely for you to be making such comments, a replay of the action shows Evans kicking Drogba on the chest and you re saying he is acting. What will u say of Ngog of liverpool who dived without any contact? The point we are saying here is Ferguson is fond of criticising refree if the action is not in his favor but close blind eye where the refree goofed to favor his team. Period

Posted by olayinka | Report as abusive
 

Tim, i dont think you watched the match closely for u to be making such comments, a replay of the action shows Evans kickin Drogba on the chest and you sayin he is acting? i beg to disagree, what will u say of Ngog of Liverpool who dived without any contact? The point we are saying here is that Ferguson is fond of criticising the officiating if it is not in his favor, but he give blind eye to those refrees who goofed to favor his team. period

Posted by olayinka | Report as abusive
 

Tim, you’re a cretin, there is no way you can have seen the incident with that response.

Posted by KG | Report as abusive
 

i cant believe any person who watched that match could be making such comments about Drogba,Tim if it were you in that position,you would be in hospital right now.man u played well but it wasnt to be so live and deal with it

Posted by christone hamoonga | Report as abusive
 

Totally agree about Ferguson and although I am not a fan of his overbearing style – he was in the right to be upset with the decision but a man of his stature should know venting on a ref like that is going to cost you. United should have won this match.

 

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