John Terry stripped of England captaincy – your views

February 5, 2010

John Terry has been stripped of the England captaincy following revelations about his private life.

Here is England coach Fabio Capello’s statement:

“After much thought, I have made the decision that it will be best for me to take the captaincy away from John Terry.

“As a captain with the team, John Terry has displayed extremely positive behaviour. However, I have to take into account other considerations and what is best for all of the England squad. What is best for all of the England team has inspired my choice.

“John Terry was notified first. When I chose John Terry as captain, I also selected a vice-captain and also named a third choice. There is no reason to change this decision.”

That implies Rio Ferdinand now becomes captain.

Is the decision fair? Does it affect England’s chances in the World Cup?

6 comments

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good, not the sort of team mate you would want, what a plonker

Posted by oldtoad | Report as abusive

Capello missed a great diplomatic opportunity today, he should have made David Beckham Squad captain for teh World Cup, which would have given him more time to choose a team captain just prior to the WC.

At the moment we do not know how fit Ferdinand is to be named captain, plus with Beckhams Ambassadorial role, he would have taken a lot of the spotlight from the team as they prepare for battle.

Posted by PURPLELINE | Report as abusive

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ITS COMICAL THAT THESE PLAYERS THINK THEY CAN DO WHAT THEY WANT WITHOUT ANY CONSEQUENSES. THE MAN HAD A AFFAIR WHICH HAPPENS EVERDAY OF THE WEEK SO LETS NOT BEAT HIM UP FOR THAT, THAT’S HIS WIFE’S JOB!BUT TRYING TO SUPPRESS THE PRESS SO HE CAN CARRY ON IS PRETTY STUPID. I WOULD ALSO SAY PLAYERS ASKING FOR TIME TO PAY SPEEDING FINES WHEN YOU EARN £100K A WEEK IS RUBBING THE ORDINARY PUBLIC’S NOSE’S IN IT, THERE IS ALWAYS A REACTION FOR EVERY ACTION LAD’S SO TIME TO CLEAN UP YOUR ACT, IF THE CAP FIT’S WEAR IT.

Posted by GUNNERY | Report as abusive

Not the first time that a sports star has crossed the line and it will not be the last. Many sportsmen are certainly not very good role models!

http://jonnyontheball.blogspot.com/2009/ 05/sports-heroes-best-role-models.html

If you want a role model, pick a non sportsman!

Posted by jonnyontheball | Report as abusive

[...] Reuters Soccer Blog » Blog Archive » John Terry stripped of …5 Feb 2010 by Mark Meadows  Reuters Soccer Blog » Blog Archive » John Terry stripped of …6 hours ago by Mark Meadows Author Profile. Mark Meadows. I am the Italy sports correspondent based in Milan. I previously worked in London. Alongside writing about Italian … – [ ] [...]

Why should we expect sportsmen to be good role models for us. They regularly let us down. Maybe we expect too much of them?

It is easy for kids to admire professional athletes who stand out in their sport. This admiration often takes the form of “hero worship” and gives kids someone to mimic in their path to adulthood. Just like their heroes, most kids can easily see themselves making the winning score or receiving the praise and lifestyle that comes with success. Many parents encourage this behaviour through buying jerseys and seeking autographs.

Professional sports are a form of entertainment just as television programs are. Like actors and actresses, professional athletes become celebrities and gain additional exposure for the things they do away from the game – blurring the line between performance and lifestyle. Parents can not always control what kids know about their favorite players. As personal celebrity becomes intermixed with professional accomplishment, kids can begin to mimic an athlete’s personal actions and mannerisms as well as an athlete’s professional skill. Kids can become confused about what it is they are trying to imitate.

However, as recent news accounts only reconfirm, professional athletes do not always make the best role models. A professional player’s conduct away from the game is often unknown. Most fans do not really know a player’s morals, ethics, work habits, and respect for teammates or for fans. Thus, most parents do not really know if they want their child to grow up mimicking the life choices of a specific professional athlete.

For kids who want heroes and parents who want role models, there can be conflict. One way around this conflict is for parents to begin distinguishing between admiration for a player’s abilities and admiration for a player. For example, saying that a professional player is a great athlete is different than saying a professional player is a great person.

Parents can help focus their children’s attention on players whose community actions are admirable even if the player’s game actions are not at the superstar level. Helping kids understand the difference between a player as a person and a player as an athlete is the key to providing the right role models for children.

Posted by jonnyontheball | Report as abusive

This is sheer hypocricy and if this was Capello’s and not the FA’s decision which he executed, it will come back to haunt him. What happens in the dressing room stays there, hence what happens outside the dressing room and off the pitch should stay out just as well. This was a matter for Terry and Bridge to sort out away from the England set-up. Or, will someone here now tell me that Rio Ferdinand, who deliberately missed a drugs test and lied to the whole world about it, is morally more fit to be England captain than John Terry?

Posted by Magicwand | Report as abusive