Reuters Soccer Blog

World Soccer views and news

Will ‘Little Pea’ make Rooney green with envy?

October 25, 2010

SOCCER-ENGLAND/Javier ‘Chicharito’ Hernandez’s two-goal and match-winning performance against Stoke City at the weekend for Manchester United could give manager Alex Ferguson the ideal headache.

Two thirds of United fans have yet to make up their mind on whether to forgive and forget the whole Rooney saga, Sky Sports reported from a Manchester Evening News poll, and with Hernandez and Berbatov on song is there an argument that the England man should have to wait to get his place back when his fitness is resolved?

A bit of healthy competition could be exactly what Rooney needs to rediscover his lethal goalscoring touch of last season.

Hernandez has shown that sort of ruthlessness regularly since it was announced in April that he was moving to United for the new season.

‘Chicharito’, meaning little pea, comes from a strong footballing background with his grandfather scoring in the 1954 World Cup and his father, nicknamed ‘Chicharo’ after his short, stocky appearance and green eyes, having played in the 1986 edition in the family’s native Mexico.

Hernandez was the quickest player recorded at the 2010 World Cup, where he scored twice before his country exited at the hands of Argentina in the last 16, in what has been a whirlwind year for the 22-year-old.

Club stalwart Gary Neville has even tipped the youngster to be a Man Utd great and he appears to have all the attributes: hard work and modesty helping hide an assassin’s touch behind the baby face.

So what do you think? Will he be straight back on the bench once Rooney has recovered? Or is there a chance of him keeping his place on merit? United could certainly do with the goals… and Rooney could use the competition.

PHOTO: Manchester United’s Javier Hernandez celebrates his second goal against Stoke City during their English Premier League soccer match at the Britannia Stadium, October 24, 2010. REUTERS/Darren Staples

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
  •