Left field

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Should NFL give Vick a second chance?

June 6, 2009

vickShould a man, having paid his debt to society for a crime he says he regrets, be forbidden from resuming a career at which he excels; a career for which his crime in no way disqualifies him (in the way that an embezzlement conviction might disqualify an accountant)?

This is the question National Football League Commissioner Roger Goodell will have to answer when Michael Vick files his reinstatement papers.

The former star quarterback with the Atlanta Falcons was released on May 20 from the Leavenworth, Kan., prison where he served nearly two years for his role in bankrolling and participating in a dogfighting ring.

Until his sentence is up July 20th, Vick will be under federal surveillance at home while he works a $10-an-hour construction job and pursues reinstatement in the NFL where big bucks are usually a sure bet.

In a country where atonement for transgressions and redemption are popular religious themes, the gifted NFL running and passing quarterback is seeking absolution from one of his harshest critics: the Humane Society of the United States. In a blog posting, Wayne Pacelle, CEO for the Humane Society of the United States, announced that the group would work hand in hand with Vick to help eradicate dogfighting among youths.

“If this is simply a self-interested ploy to rehabilitate his image or return to football, we will find out soon enough, and we will repudiate it. But if Michael Vick is sincere, then we can, we must, use his story to advance our broader mission—saving lives and ending dogfighting,” Pacelle said.

Now that Michael Vick has served his prison sentence and secured the endorsement of the Humane Society, do you think the NFL should re-instate him?

Comments

Michael Vick has served his sentence. He was guilty and he served his time for the crime. Everything he had was taken away from him, his fortune, his fame and his freedom. 1.5 million children were aborted in the United States last year, there will be no cry for their lives. Michael Vick will be judged until the day he dies for what he did to these animals. He admitted his guilt, he did his time and now he deserves the chance to make a living. We have punished this man enough.

 

Once you have paid your debt to society you should be allowed to move on until you show that you have not learned the error of your ways. The American society has learned to forgive, or at least let live, far worse human beings than Michael Vick: see OJ Simpson (charged with two counts of murder), Michael Jackson (charged with sexual assault on a minor), the hero-worship so much of the public has for John Gotti (13 counts of murder, conspiracy to commit murder, loansharking, racketeering, obstruction of justice, illegal gambling, and tax evasion), Kirby Puckett (charged with sexual assault and false imprisonment), Mike Tyson (sexual assault, cocaine possession and driving under the influence), Kobe Bryant (sexual assault). I doubt Uegeth Urbina and Rae Carruth will face as much public nit-picking when they are released.

Posted by Derek | Report as abusive
 

I almost forgot another one: If we are going to continuously punish Michael Vick, don’t we also need to harass Don King. What? You mean you don’t remember. Ah, well most don’t. We’ve, as a collective society, since forgiven him for the two murders, ON HUMANS, he committed. But by all means, let’s please destroy Michael Vick.

Posted by Derek | Report as abusive
 

If an NFL team does not pick him up…come on up to the CFL. Wide open field, great style of play…HE WILL EXCEL IN THE CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE. He’s paid his debt.

Posted by Wayne | Report as abusive
 

No way! He is a felon, and has milkd the public for millions already. He doesn’t deserve an elite job like an NFL player. Keep the league free of criminals!

Posted by P Diddy | Report as abusive
 

US society’s hypocrisy is amazing. There seems to be more humanity for animals than for fellow human beings. If MV were a white sports talent of equal skill none of this would ever have been a story. It’s always about money and MV did something other than what became the story. To deny a man his right to work after doing time is inhumane.

Posted by Chris | Report as abusive
 

let the man play football.he served his time in prison so let him play.ray lewis killed somebody and so did o.j.good luck to mv and the team he goes too

 

Michael Vicks is a dog. Feed him to the dogs and not to the NFL.

Posted by Melvin | Report as abusive
 

To the NFL it all comes down to money… The Dog Murder will play again… Eddie DeBartolo is barred for life, yet this low life street thug, who can put money in the pockets of the league owners will get to play again…

 

Although dog fighting is something I do not condone, I think the punishment was excessive. When a country legally murders 2 millions human babies a year by abortion, dog fighting doesn’t seems that important. Just goes to show you how upside down our morals are in this country. Until we get a grasp on what is really important, this country is in big trouble.
Dave Bradley

Posted by david bradley | Report as abusive
 

He has paid his dues,

Posted by MIKE | Report as abusive
 

Absolutely Vick should be allowed to return to the NFL

Posted by Art Zimmerman | Report as abusive
 

His debt to society has been paid, let the man play! I cant wait to see what he does next. Here is an interesting article on the future for Mike Vick: http://www.mindreign.com/en/mindshare/Sp orts/What-s-Next-for-Mike-Vick-3f/sl4076 3392bp324cpp10pn1.html

Posted by Jim Tressor | Report as abusive
 

I am disappointed that I cannot watch my Colts play tonight because our family has boycotted watching any team the Eagles play. I hope they lose every game this season. But I guess a bunch of testosteroned guys don’t care who they play with.

Posted by pam pandalis | Report as abusive
 

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