Left field

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Home of Golf could do with more star quality

December 8, 2009

BRITAIN/Scotland might be the “Home of Golf” but it seems the talent packed its bags and moved out long ago.

With nary a Scotsman in the 2008 Ryder Cup team and the country’s highest ranked player  Martin Laird at 104 in the world something is clearly very wrong with the game back home.

China, Colombia and Canada all have higher ranked players than the top Scotsman. Japan alone has seven in the top 100.

And just when things looked like they couldn’t get any worse, Scotland has again proved there’s further to fall. Of the 28 teams competing at the World Cup of Golf in China last month, Scotland finished dead last – trailing traditional golfing hotbeds such as Pakistan and Brazil.

The two players in the Scotland team were David Drysdale and Alastair Forsyth, ranked 164th and 253rd  in the world. Where’s  Scotland’s Rory McIlroy? Ross Fisher – he must be Scottish surely?

The sad fact is that apart from Andy Murray, Scots have precious little to cheer about on the world sporting stage.

For far too long the country’s golfing eggs were all put in one basket, clinging to the hope that Colin Montgomerie would stay out of a strop long enough to win a major. Sandy Lyle (1988 US Masters) and Paul Lawrie (1999 British Open) are the only two Scotsmen to win major championships in the last 20 years. And Lyle was born in England.

It’s not all bad news though – Montgomerie is captain of next year’s European Ryder Cup team so at least there’ll be one Scottish accent there.

PHOTO: Golfers watch a tee shot on the fourth tee during the World Hickory Golf Championship at the Gullane golf course in East Lothian, Scotland September 24, 2009. The PGA World Hickory Open takes place over two days at the Gullane number 2 course with thirty four golfers taking part using old hickory clubs. REUTERS/David Moir

Comments

Trouble is Monty’s accent is as far from being Scottish as Prince Charles. If only he’d put one on…

Posted by 1983Pilchard | Report as abusive
 

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