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What sort of reaction can Tiger expect?

March 23, 2010

PEOPLE-WOODS/The world’s number one golfer has finally announced his comeback date but it is unclear whether Tiger is completely out of the Woods yet.

Woods told ESPN on Sunday that he didn’t have a clue what sort of reception he would get from the galleries on his return at next month’s U.S. Masters, admitting he was a “little nervous” about the prospect.

British bookmakers Ladbrokes have been quick to respond to the American’s television interview with a wide-range of betting suggestions.

Among the odds on offer is 5-1 on Woods being booed on the first tee at Augusta National.

Ladbrokes spokesman Nick Weinberg said: “The eyes of the world will be on Tiger and any indiscretion will be pounced on as he continues his rehabilitation.”

Woods is also a heavy favourite at 3-1 to win the coveted Green Jacket while it is an 8-1 chance that he misses the cut.

Among the less likely scenarios, the 14-times major champion is considered a 25-1 shot to kiss an anonymous blonde (not counting John Daly) and 500-1 to fight a fan.

What do you think ? Will cat-calls be the order of the day for Tiger or should golf followers show their appreciation for the world number one’s return by cheering him to the rafters?

FILE PHOTO: Tiger Woods watches play during his foursome match at the Presidents Cup golf tournament at Harding Park, San Francisco, California, in this October 8, 2009 pic. REUTERS/Shaun Best

Comments

His choice of Augusta is the right one given the additional security on the course (even reporters aren’t allowed past the rope). They will make sure anyone even remotely taunting him will get the boot.

Posted by Cato1 | Report as abusive
 

Golf fans being the decent sort wont give him any bother. The clicks of camera lenses, which used to annoy him anyway, will now be quadrupled at the tees however

Posted by MarkMeadows | Report as abusive
 

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