Left field

The Reuters global sports blog

Greg Rusedski blog: Murray will one day win a grand slam event

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The second week of Wimbledon started with another massive upset. The world number 1 and a lot of people’s pick to win the championship, Maria Sharapova, lost in the fourth round to Sabine Lisicki of Germany in straight sets.

This really opened up the top half of the woman’s draw and meant there would be a new world number 1. Victoria Azarenka the world number 2 or Agnieszka  Radwanska the world number 3 would become the new world number 1. It all depended on who went further in the tournament.  Radwanska took full advantage of Sharapova losing and made her first Grand Slam final.

On the other side of the draw Serena Williams powered her way through the draw to get back to the finals. In the semi-finals she outclassed Azarenka, which meant Radwanska became the new world number 1 on Monday. Serena beat Radwanska in the finals in three sets but never really looked like losing the match. If Serena played a full schedule, she would be the world number 1.  This was not a good thing for woman’s tennis because the new world number 1 will be like all other previous world number 1′s on the woman’s side, who never have won a Grand Slam.

On the men’s side Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer, Andy Murray, and Jo-Wilfred Tsonga all made the semi-finals. This was the expected line up once Rafael Nadal lost in the second round.

Other sports can learn from chilled out Tour de France

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This has been my first Tour de France and it has been like going back in time.

Sport has become big business and egos have exploded too, while security restrictions have made visiting many stadiums something of a chore.

But not on the Tour. To say the French approach is laissez faire is an understatement. As a journalist you can practically go wherever you want with hardly any checks, even standing just behind the stage finish line. Yes you might get your toes clipped as the rider speeds past but the access to the cyclists is remarkable.

Van Persie in the hunt for medals, not money

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By Phil O’Connor

As the annual Arsenal transfer soap-opera gets underway, it’s worth wondering why such high-profile players leave one of England’s best clubs every year.

Should Robin van Persie sign for Manchester City, much will be made of their financial muscle, but they are not the only club in England with resources – indeed, Arsenal are one of the richest clubs in the world and could easily afford to offer competitive wages.

Still craving Euro 2012? Get ready for Euro 2013

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By Phil O’Connor

As Spain’s victorious Euro 2012 male side returned to Madrid with the Henri Delaunay trophy, football administrators in Sweden were already working to make Euro 2013 for women a similar success.

Euro 2013 is the second-biggest event UEFA are planning next year, after the Champions League final for men,” former Sweden international Viktoria Svensson told Reuters in an interview.

from Photographers' Blog:

Robo-cams go for Olympic gold

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By Fabrizio Bensch

Is it possible to get 11 photographers into a box and put them in a position where you could never place a photographer? Normally, it would be absolutely impossible. But nothing is impossible when it comes to the Olympic games.

The London Olympic summer games will produce huge emotions, records and we as the Reuters photographers team will catch it from any extraordinary angle. When athletes from around the world compete against each other for the glory of an Olympic medal, hundreds of photographers try to capture the one and only moment which makes the Olympic games so unique.

“Boring” Spain set new standards

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Chastised and lambasted in the early stages of Euro 2012 for passing the ball sideways and backwards too often for the liking of goal-hungry fans and journalists, who had thrived in the feast of a wildly entertaining tournament, Spain silenced all their critics with a ruthless of display of flamboyant flair and lethal finishing in a one-sided final which made Italy look like a bunch of schoolboys.

Vicente Del Bosque’s “boring” strategy, based on deploying a strikerless formation to draw out opponents who park the proverbial bus in their own half, in fact proved to be a masterstroke which none of Spain’s rivals could cope with.

from Photographers' Blog:

The Olympic Games: Much more than the stars

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By Denis Balibouse

"The important thing in life is not victory, but the fight; the main thing is not to have won, but to have fought well." Baron Pierre de Coubertin

I have always been addicted to sports, any kind of sports. My father was a sports reporter in Switzerland. As a child I would follow him onto soccer pitches, motocross grounds and ice hockey rinks. Whenever I travel somewhere I try to follow the local sports. I even attempted to understand cricket (I'm married to an Australian), although I have to confess, I have so far failed with this one.

Greg Rusedski blog – I can’t wait for second week of Wimbledon

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The first week of the Wimbledon Championships, on the men’s side, ended up being one of the most exciting of all time.

There were major upsets, epic matches, and conspiracy theories. The biggest upset in over a decade happened in the second round of the men’s singles when Rafa Nadal, many people’s pick for the championship, lost to the unheralded Lukas Rosol of the Czech Republic.

Quick quizzes reveal Spain players’ secrets

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If you wanted to find out some intimate details about the Spain team competing at Euro 2012 you could do a lot worse than read the series of quickfire interviews published over the past few weeks in El Pais daily.

 Bombarded with questions like how much do you spend each month on petrol, who is Lech Walesa, how often does coach Vicente del Bosque trim his moustache and how much did goalkeeper and captain Iker Casillas weigh when he was born, Fernando Torres, Cesc Fabregas and their team mates come up with some interesting and revealing answers.

from Photographers' Blog:

Editing the Euro 2012

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By Wolfgang Rattay

If you're really interested in understanding how we at Reuters work as a team across Europe to make sure that the right pictures from the Euro 2012 soccer championships arrive in time at hundreds of online sites and the next day in the papers, read this insight. You will understand that everyone in the team is an important cog in the machine and that not everything is someone sitting in the right corner of the pitch and triggering the camera's shutter. If you read until the end, you will be rewarded with Amanda's secret "spell-checker" recipe. It's worth it -- but only if you don't have any health issues with your stomach.

SLIDESHOW: BEST OF EURO 2012

At each game we have five photographers assigned to cover the match. Four are seated, preferably, in each far corner of the pitch near the corner pole and the fifth shooter has an elevated position in the middle of the tribune - more or less at the same position as the main TV cameras. The 'tribune photographer" shoots with three cameras. Two cameras are equipped with a 70-200mm zoom lens and aimed at both penalty boxes to make sure we have the image that tells the story of the game. This can be a goal, a penalty or a disallowed goal like in the England-Croatia match. The third camera is hand-held with either a four, five or six-hundred mm lens to shoot clear action (with green grass and no advertising boards), reactions of coached players and what ever else happens on the pitch.

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