Left field

The Reuters global sports blog

Fading spotlight a nightmare for Bonds

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When Barry Bonds was playing baseball he seemed to crave attention. He wanted and needed the spotlight to be fixated on him. But like a spoiled child, he did not care if the attention was positive or negative as long as people were talking about him. For Bonds, the negative far outweighed the positive.San Francisco Giants Barry Bonds watches from the dugout in the second inning as the Giants take on the San Diego Padres during their MLB National League baseball game in San Francisco, California in this September 24, 2007 file photo. Bonds tested positive for steroids in November 2001, just a month after hitting his record 73rd home run of the season, U.S. prosecutors said on February 15, 2008. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith/Files

Jeff Pearlman, who wrote Love Me, Hate Me: Barry Bonds and the Making of an Antihero, sums Bonds up perfectly as “the undisputed president and CEO of the AMSAPS (Arrogant, Mean-Spirited Athletes in Professional Sports) Movement. Inside clubhouses, he scowled at teammates, reporters and club employees as if they were grime beneath his freshly manicured fingernails. On the field, he ignored 99 percent of fans who called his name, desperate for an autograph, a wave or even a simple nod. He treated his personal staffers like cockroaches and his wives like broken appliances.”

Now that it has been over two years since he has played in a professional game, his tireless work to be the most discussed player is still paying modest dividends, albeit in a twisted and increasingly diminished way.

ESPN the Magazine conducted an anonymous player poll during spring training consisting of 20 ‘hot-button’ issues, including the elimination of the designated hitter and what the reaction in the clubhouse would be to an openly gay team mate. But there was one question — should Barry Bonds be in the National Baseball Hall of Fame? — that will grab most, if not all, of the attention. The answer is inconsequential. It is the name, Barry Bonds, that will generate the discussion.

Will cricketers follow baseball sluggers down drugs path?

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CARDINALS/Reports that Major League Baseball will introduce testing for synthetic Human Growth Hormone (HGH) in its minor leagues next season year prompt disturbing memories of the explosion in power hitting in the 1990s headed by Mark McGwire and Barry Bonds.

This year McGwire admitted he had taken steroids when he broke Roger Maris’s long-standing home run record in 1998.

Fixing baseball’s embarrassing problem

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bondsaster“The cat – mmrrrooowwwrr – is out of the bag!” – Seinfeld’s Cosmo Kramer upon the realization that his first name had finally been revealed.

Alex Rodriguez (click link for video), Barry Bonds, Sammy Sosa, David Ortiz and Manny Ramirez are among the players linked to performance enhancing drugs. The cat, is most definitely out of the bag.

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