Left field

The Reuters global sports blog

Formula 1 starts 2010 with a headache

Photo
-

MOTOR-RACING/RENAULTFormer champion Niki Lauda did not mince his words last year when he said that Formula One’s Singapore Grand Prix race-fixing scandal demanded the heaviest of punishments to restore credibility.

A Times headline called Brazilian Nelson Piquet’s deliberate crash at the 2008 race “the worst act of cheating in the history of sport.”

Renault were handed a suspended permanent ban, with the authorities eager to keep them in the sport, while former team boss Flavio Briatore was barred for life and his engineeering head Pat Symonds for five years.

Piquet, the driver at the eye of the storm, walked away without sanction after being handed immunity for telling the governing FIA how he had obeyed orders to help team mate Fernando Alonso to win the race.

The worst act of cheating in sport?

Photo
-

MOTOR-RACING-PRIXThe back page of today’s Times carries an opinion piece that pulls no punches about Formula One’s race-fixing controversy.

“The worst act of cheating in the history of sport,” is the headline.

Would you drive into a wall if someone asked you to?

Photo
-

Crashing a Formula One car is easy. Even I could do that, although fitting into the cockpit might be a bit of a squeeze. It’s the driving that is difficult.

In the old days, when there were fewer races in a season but more funerals, you crashed at your peril. 

  •