Comments on: The Russian sanctions information gap http://blogs.reuters.com/stories-id-like-to-see/2014/07/29/the-russian-sanctions-information-gap/ Steven Brill Tue, 19 Aug 2014 18:30:28 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: L00kHere http://blogs.reuters.com/stories-id-like-to-see/2014/07/29/the-russian-sanctions-information-gap/comment-page-1/#comment-606 Tue, 12 Aug 2014 14:40:00 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/stories-id-like-to-see/?p=1843#comment-606 Very good column. There is just so little follow up in today’s news environment.

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By: Cassiopian http://blogs.reuters.com/stories-id-like-to-see/2014/07/29/the-russian-sanctions-information-gap/comment-page-1/#comment-602 Fri, 01 Aug 2014 13:42:55 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/stories-id-like-to-see/?p=1843#comment-602 The Obama Administration can draw on various legislation to implement sanctions, especially the Export Administration Act which allows for national security export controls (on dual use technology, military equipment) and foreign policy export controls, the purpose of which is to promote American foreign policy goals. Carter and Reagan utilized both to initiate controls against the Soviets, Libya, and South Africa, among others. The extra-territorial application of such controls, however, is always a controversial issue and the Europeans refused to enforce them when Reagan tried to force American subsidiaries in Europe to comply with the U.S. embargo of the Yamal pipeline.
Currently, the U.S. Chamber of commerce, the Business Roundtable and other corporate lobbies in the U.S. are fighting to ensure that no unilateral sanctions will be imposed by Obama, which would inevitably damage their business opportunities in Russian and allow European firms to fill the gap. However, multilateral sanctions will inevitably damage European business more than American business interests, given their larger stakes in terms of trade and direct foreign investment

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