Stories I’d like to see

Should Obamacare be derailed by a single sentence?

By Steven Brill
November 11, 2014

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Most disputes that end up at the U.S. Supreme Court are about the interpretation of the Constitution and statutes, not about facts. The press is mostly left to provide the basic background of the dispute and then quote each side’s lawyers. Little independent digging is required.

Finding Obamacare’s authors; assessing J&J’s CEO culpability; and grading Chris Christie

By Steven Brill
November 12, 2013

1. Finding the folks who wrote Obamacare:

As I report a story I am writing about Obamacare, it’s become clear to me that — as we are already seeing with the controversy over people getting their insurance plans dropped — there are all kinds of issues related to provisions in the massive law that are bound to get lots more attention once the website is working. A few weeks ago in this column, for example, I mentioned the as-yet-little-noticed high penalties that smokers will have to pay.

Breaking procurement rules to fix Healthcare.gov, the Red Cross and Sandy, and Westerners choking in China

By Steven Brill
October 29, 2013

1. Breaking procurement rules to fix Healthcare.gov?

In the weeks immediately following the failure of the federal government’s Obamacare exchange website, policy wonks who were inclined to attach larger meaning to the fiasco than the simple incompetence of those in charge pointed to how difficult and time-consuming government procurement is.

Teflon Tim Geithner, and profiling the Center for Responsive Politics

By Steven Brill
July 9, 2013

1.  Teflon Tim and the Obama Keystone Cops:

Did the First Amendment get amended when I wasn’t watching so that freedom of the press is guaranteed except when it comes to writing about Timothy Geithner?