Opinion

Stories I’d like to see

Regrouping for Detroit, GM’s bankruptcy evasion and Chinese corporate records

Steven Brill
Apr 29, 2014 05:00 UTC

1. Kevyn Orr and a Detroit rebound?

Last Friday, I happened onto a C-Span broadcast of a speech to a national group of bankruptcy lawyers given by Kevyn Orr — the emergency manager who Michigan Governor Rick Snyder appointed to take over Detroit’s finances and guide the fallen city through bankruptcy. Since I couldn’t stand watching the Yankees get slaughtered by the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, I stopped on the Orr speech for a minute. I stayed 45.

I had never seen Orr speak or paid much attention to Detroit’s troubles and his efforts to dig the city out from under. But if his talk — riveting, funny, emotional, self-effacing, forceful, fact-filled, wholly convincing and seemingly off the cuff — is any indication, both Orr and Detroit 2014 are big national stories.

They are worthy of coverage beyond the good work that’s been done by, among other local outlets, the Detroit Free Press, which ran this comprehensive story  last month, on the one-year anniversary of Orr leaving a lucrative partnership at the Jones, Day law firm to take on the rescue job.

It’s a job that involves balancing the needs of retired police officers and fire fighters, who had every moral right (and probably an impregnable right under the state constitution) to expect to be paid the pensions (averaging about $30,000 a year) they were promised against the need to relight the city’s street lamps and provide funds for ambulances and fire trucks to improve horrifying response times.

Orr negotiated a pension deal two weeks ago. He has had to figure out how to make sure the city’s stellar collection in its Detroit Institute of Arts doesn’t have to be auctioned to pay off bond-holders, while also creating incentives for investors to come back to Detroit. It’s all being done against the backdrop of a decades-long legacy of local government so incompetent and corrupt that there’s a stench associated with making good on any debts or union contracts it negotiated — even if the people, particularly the pensioners, relying on those promises are not to blame.

Sealing deadly court files, and Obama and his Cabinet

Steven Brill
Apr 15, 2014 04:44 UTC

1. Sealing deadly court files:

In the wake of continuing disclosures about General Motors’ failure to acknowledge critical safety issues related to faulty ignition switches, there’s a looming issue that has not been addressed: How litigation settlements negotiated by private parties can result in court-sanctioned cover-ups that endanger the public.

We now know that there were several cases in which the families of people who died in crashes after ignition switches failed quietly received cash settlements from GM.

In return for the cash, the plaintiffs not only promised to withhold the settlement details but also agreed with GM that the court files would be sealed. In some cases, those sealed records included documents and transcripts of pre-trial deposition testimony that contained evidence gathered about the dangers of the faulty switches.

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