Summit Notebook

Exclusive outtakes from industry leaders

Your skin care for the cost of a cup of coffee

June 9, 2009

Estee Lauder is doing its best to ensure its customers’ skin routines are not falling victim to the recession.

The makeup and skin care maker is offering more products at its cheapest prices, and having its sales people pitch the value of its merchandise to the customers that visit its makeup counters in department stores. 

For instance, its top-selling Clinique three-step skin care regimen (Cleanse. Exfoliate. Moisturize.) costs about $40.

The company is making sure that customers who at buy the regime know it lasts three months.

“You can get the best of your skin care routine with 50 cents per day, which is much less than a cup of coffee,” Fabrizio Freda, President and Chief Operating Officer of The Estée Lauder Companies told the Reuters Global Luxury summit.

“This simple explanation to the consumer, in this moment, is very telling. We have educated our consultants to be able to speak intrinsic value of the brands when they have conversation with people at the counter — beyond giving the normal suggestions on skin care routines.”

(Photo: Reuters)

Comments

Value for money is serious business in the world of skin care, recession or not. Regardless of what one spends, one should try to find products that need just a tiny amount with each application. These are the products with less water and more active ingredients. For richer products, especially the cleansers and the moisturizers, one can use much, much less by diluting the product first with fresh green tea or a little spring water before applying it to the face. If you can do that without there being no product on your hands once you add the water, you’re onto a value for money product!

 

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