Would the last person to leave the smelter please turn out the lights?

March 8, 2010

For UC RUSAL, one simple act is crucial to reducing costs.
Bonuses for managers at the world’s largest aluminium company
depend on the company’s 75,000 workers heeding the message.
“We have to introduce a new culture: if you leave the
office, turn off the lights,” Artyom Volynets, UC RUSAL’s deputy
chief executive for strategy, said at Reuters Global Mining and
Steel Summit on Monday.
“We have 16 smelters, each with their own headquarters and
offices. We employ 75,000 people. If each one of them is
switching off the lights at the end of their shift, that would
help tremendously.”
UC RUSAL embarked on a major drive to slash production costs
last year as part of an ultimately successful attempt to secure
Russia’s largest ever private sector debt restructuring.
Easy access to Siberian hydroelectric power, compared with
relatively high-cost coal used to power smelters in other parts
of the world, affords UC RUSAL a distinct cost advantage when
making aluminium used in transport, construction and packaging.
In the first half of 2009, it cost UC RUSAL an average
$1,400 to produce a tonne of aluminium. The metal is now selling
at above $2,200 a tonne.
UC RUSAL has cut costs by sourcing cheaper raw materials of
better quality and improving throughput rates at its smelters in
Siberia, which account for about 80 percent of its total output.
But cheap power in Siberia had also led to complacency.
“Our smelters are located in probably the only remaining
major energy-long region in the world. Therefore, if you buy
power at 2 cents per kilowatt, you don’t really care how much
you spend,” Volynets said.
“For my colleagues on the operational side of the business,
their key performance indicators are 100 percent tied to cost
improvements,” he said. “They will not be compensated if these
improvements are not implemented.”
(Writing by Robin Paxton in Moscow)

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