Summit Notebook

Paranoid governments and conspiracy theories

September 27, 2010
Adi Godrej

Adi Godrej

Adi Godrej, who marshals his namesake $2.5 billion diversified group, believes the Indian government is “paranoid” about the possible effects of allowing more foreign investments into sectors such as airlines.

Infrastructure still top-of-mind in India

September 24, 2010

INDIA/
On Monday, we kick-off the 2010 India Investment Summit. We’ll have exclusive interviews in Mumbai and Bangalore. In 2006 we held the first Reuters India Investment Summit. It was my first time in India. I’ve had the privilege to return every year. How time flies. Here we are four years later. Some of the key players may have changed but the big, over-arching theme is still the same: Infrastructure. It’s the key to realizing the country’s potential but bureaucracy, tough financing and hesitant overseas investment have slowed development in the sector, calling into question the future of India as a powerhouse.

200MB? It’s only human nature to want more

By georgina prodhan
December 1, 2009

Broadband subscribers want as much speed as they can get their hands on, even if it’s way beyond what’s needed by the most avid downloader of music, keen watcher of video or biggest Facebook addict, reckons cable operator Liberty Global’s CEO.

Moscow: The least worst place for your money

September 14, 2009

   Russian investment bank Renaissance Capital was a big backer of Moscow’s ambition to become a major emerging-markets financial centre, a bridge between European and Asian capital, a rival to Dubai.

Kinder: wind, solar not the answer to U.S. energy needs

June 2, 2009

Rich Kinder, CEO of Kinder Morgan Energy Partners, says the Obama Administration’s push to develop alternative energy sources such as wind and solar are not the answer to reducing the nation’s dependence on oil or reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Click below to hear where Kinder thinks the U.S. should be focusing its attention.

Kinder: wind, solar not the answer from Reuters TV on Vimeo.

AUDIO – Wait a minute, we have to pay for all this stuff?

May 7, 2009

Unfortunately, we do.

All the infrastructure projects in the world sound great! They look awesome on paper, they’ll make people’s lives better and they’ll let us go visit our friends and families in about half the time it used to take.

AUDIO – Everything has a cost

May 6, 2009

There’s no such thing as a free lunch.

Or bridge. Or turnpike.

Every project we’re talking about at Reuters first-ever Reuters Infrastructure Summit has an enormous cost — sometimes in the hundreds of billions of dollars. And governments are looking for ways to pay for it all.

AUDIO – Finding a model; then build, baby, build!

May 6, 2009

Infrastructure spending. Public-private partnerships. Government buildouts.

This week, all of these kinds of phrases are much on the mind of our guests at the first ever Reuters Infrastructure Summit held in New York, San Francisco and Washington.

Welcome to the 2009 Infrastructure Summit

May 5, 2009

The Obama Administration has made infrastructure spending one of its top priorities as the nation grapples with mounting needs for its roads, bridges, water supply, power grid, schools and solid waste. As states and other municipalities struggle to find innovative financing for hundreds of billions of dollars of projects, new investments will soon be available for both individuals and institutions.
 
The increase in private-public partnerships is one topic high on financiers’ radar screens as localities are under more pressure to get projects started and obtain the needed funding for them. “Infrastructure” as a concept has become something of a catch-all and we will be pressing our guests to discuss how worried they are that less-critical projects will get piled into more important ones.
 
How will California deal with its growing water need? What’s the outlook for infrastructure for investors? How hamstrung are governments with all the need?  How tenuous are ratings? How long a window is there for these projects, politically?