Summit Notebook

Exclusive outtakes from industry leaders

from Ask...:

Where oil prices will be in June 2012?

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Wars and revolutions across the Middle East and North Africa and the Japanese earthquake and tsunami have sent oil and gas prices soaring with economists worrying over the impact of escalating energy costs on global growth. Last week, for the first time in a decade, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries failed to reach an agreement to boost the output as Saudi Arabia did not convince the others that world's economy will need more fuel.

From June 13 to June 15, Reuters Global Energy and Climate Summit 2011 will feature more than 60 global decision-makers in the energy and climate businesses to discuss the challenges facing the 21st century. This is your chance to give us your forecast on whether oil prices are more likely to got back to their peak of $147 per barrel hit on 2008, or below the current range of around $120.

Paranoid governments and conspiracy theories

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Adi Godrej

Adi Godrej

Adi Godrej, who marshals his namesake $2.5 billion diversified group, believes the Indian government is “paranoid” about the possible effects of allowing more foreign investments into sectors such as airlines.

“They (the Indian government) have not allowed foreign airlines to invest in private airlines, and they cite security. I don’t see what security would be compromised,” Godrej told the Reuters India Investment Summit in Mumbai.

Angelides: People make mistakes, take Alan Greenspan and Captain of Titanic

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Phil Angelides, Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission chairman, says he’d rather see some taking of responsibility than hear another “I’m sorry.”

REGULATION-SUMMIT/“Personally I don’t see my role as … to obtain apologies. What I don’t hear is a sense of responsibility and self-assessment about what occurred. There seems to be a disconnect between the practices that people undertook and the financial collapse,” he said at the Reuters Global Financial Regulation Summit.

Where disaster and compensation intersect you’ll find Kenneth Feinberg

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You can call him mediator, or you can call him negotiator, but don’t call him pay czar. REGULATION-SUMMIT/

Kenneth Feinberg says he doesn’t like the shorthand title that’s used to describe his role as the administration’s supervisor of compensation practices at firms that received money under the government’s Troubled Asset Relief Program.

Shunning bankers

Banker bashing has become a bit of an international sport — and fraud allegations against Wall Street giant Goldman Sachs and a U.S. class-action suit against Germany’s Deutsche Bank has added more grist to the mill. So it’s small wonder that a bank lobby group struck a wistful note at the Reuters Global Financial Regulation Summit in London on Tuesday.

“No politician, for the next couple of years, is going to be close to a banker, hug a banker, be friendly to a banker,” said Mark Austen, the acting chief executive of AFME (Association for Financial Markets in Europe). “They (banks) are seen as institutions that have caused a crisis … We are still faced with a public’s anger to the banking community … It will take time to rebuild that trust.”

Eliot Spitzer loved politics, so will he run again?

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This much is clear — Eliot Spitzer loved politics, he loved being New York governor, he loved being New York attorney general.

So will he run for public office again?

Well here it gets a little bit like watching a tennis ball going back and forth over the net. REGULATION-SUMMIT/

Against high Hill drama, SEC chief mum on Goldman

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First of all, Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Mary Schapiro would not talk about Goldman Sachs.

There was no drawing her out. The head of the agency that filed a civil fraud lawsuit charging that Goldman misled investors would not say a word about the case. GOLDMAN/

FDIC Chair Bair: think before you point that finger…

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The latest blame game circulating in Washington on financial regulation may end up with those who point fingers  finding that they have three fingers pointing back.

During the debate on tightening financial regulations, there have been some backhanded jabs at regulators with the implication that perhaps they were asleep at the wheel. Just this morning on NBC’s “Today” show, Democratic Senator Claire McCaskill said Wall Street had been creating things just to bet on — “they were like the casino, but they had less regulation than Las Vegas.”

What if there were no “too big to fail”? Fed’s Hoenig has a vision

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USA/Democrats and Republicans alike on Capitol Hill say they want to toss out the concept of “too big to fail” in the financial regulation reform they are tussling over. That way if a financial firm is going to go under, it will go under, with no thought for a taxpayer handout.

Since the concept of “too big to fail” has yet to be erased by law, and its demise yet to be tested by a failing financial institution, it was interesting to hear how Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank President Thomas Hoenig envisioned the financial industry without that concept to lean on.

CFTC’s Gensler explains the present with the past

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Gary Gensler, chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, likes to go to the past — sometimes as far back as 1,000 years — to explain the financial situations of today.

REGULATION-SUMMIT/For example, derivatives existed for 145 years, since the Civil War, and they became regulated in the 1930s, he said at a Reuters Global Financial Regulation Summit in explaining that derivatives need regulation.

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