Summit Notebook

Exclusive outtakes from industry leaders

from MediaFile:

Twitter’s Costolo: not quite footloose and fancy free

Photo

You'd think fast-racing Twitter would keep one eye firmly fixed on the rearview and side mirrors.

With the Internet landscape littered with also-rans -- from pets.com to AskJeeves.com to a Facebook-steamrolled MySpace -- you'd imagine the one thing overnight Internet microblogging phenomenon Twitter would fear the most would be to get displaced by an up-and-comer with the same alarming speed.

Not so. Chief Operating Officer Dick Costolo insists no one at the company he has worked at for less than a year worries about two theoretical guys in a garage dreaming up the next social networking sensation.

"That's a fun question. The way I think about that is the only thing to prevent us from being successful is us," said the co-founder and CEO of FeedBurner, a digital content syndication platform that was acquired by Google in the summer of 2007. "This stuff that's out of my control -- I've got no hair and I'm too stressed out as is," said the bespectacled, balding executive who joined Twitter in September.

Facebook’s Zuckerberg talks MySpace, Twitter

Photo

Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg spoke to the Reuters Global Technology Summit on Tuesday and while he wouldn’t touch TechCrunch’s report about financing and valuation, he did opine about a few of Facebook’s Web peers:

On the difference between Facebook and MySpace:

I think MySpace defines themselves as more of a media company and a media portal. A way to see the different content that is going on, or a way for a News Corp parent company to spread content through the network. Facebook has always been more focused on helping people build out their identity, helping people maintain their relationships and communicate really efficiently. We have talked about ourselves as a technology company a lot as opposed to a media company.

from MediaFile:

Dial M For MySpace mobile advertising

Photo

MySpace co-founder Chris DeWolfe is bullish on the mobile advertising market, but says ad agencies and corporate sponsors haven't figured out to dial into it.

Speaking at the Reuters Media Summit, DeWolfe outlined MySpace's mobile efforts, such as its Blackberry application. He said the company was targeting more download applications for mobile devices. He said he saw big opportunities in the mobile-based advertising sector once there's some standardization.

  •