Summit Notebook

Recession’s perfect storm speeds up change in ad industry

December 2, 2009

Why is it that the United States’ advertising as a proportion of marketing services is at its lowest point since 1977, maybe even lower than since the Second World War?

Upstarts!

November 3, 2009

The U.S. government has pumped more than $100 billion into Detroit over the past year to keep automakers General Motors and Chrysler alive. But some of the sector’s remaining capitalists are having a hard time stomaching a $25 billion Department of Energy loan program intended to spark new developments in electric cars. 

Toyota will not freeze out Iceland, bets on Russia bounce

November 3, 2009

The world’s biggest carmaker, Toyota, will not follow the road of McDonald’s and abandon Iceland even though it is selling ‘very few’ cars there at the moment and its distributor has been seized by the banks as its owner went belly-up, Toyota Motor Europe President and CEO Tadashi Arashima told the Reuters Auto Summit in Paris on Tuesday.
“We have a big market share there, of 25 percent, and it is good for our after-sales,” Arashima said.
The banks are trying to sell the distributor but Toyota does not plan to take ownership like it does in its key European markets of Germany, France, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom, and some Scandinavian countries.
 

AUDIO – The ‘new normal’ for the U.S. auto industry

November 2, 2009

A few years ago, one of the guests at our annual Reuters Autos Summit — Tom Stallkamp from Ripplewood — pretty much stopped everyone dead in their tracks by predicting that auto sales in the United States was likely to fall to an obscenely low level of 14.5 million.

AUDIO – A new emerging market for real estate

June 23, 2009

Remember the good old days where — if you lived in the United States anyway — people would talk about “emerging markets”?

AUDIO – ‘Off to the Outlets’ — A new real estate mantra

June 23, 2009

When it comes to shopping for bargains these days, retailers are expanding their window of possibilities the same way as increasingly price-conscious consumers.

OPEC’s special relationship with the U.S.

June 2, 2009

The United States may fondly dream of independence from imported oil, but it would do well to remember that the traffic is not one way.
OPEC Secretary General Abdullah al-Badri told the Reuters Global Energy Summit he had been hearing for years that the world’s biggest oil consumer was seeking ways to avoid importing OPEC oil, but he was confident it would carry on burning fossil fuel for years to come.
“I am of an age when I can tell you I have been hearing this for the last 40 years,” Badri said. “We will see another president, with two terms, before we see any change.”
He also warned the U.S. it should be careful what it wished for.
“We would like to tell them they buy most of the resources of our member countries. We are sending them back more than 50 percent of that income to OECD countries, and the U.S. is one of them, to buy medicine, equipment, aeroplanes, spare parts, clothes.”
“Don’t forget the medicine,” he added.