Tales from the Trail

Gingrich warns fellow Republicans of possible disaster

May 6, 2008

WASHINGTON – Former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich is warning fellow Republicans in the U.S. Congress that they face a possible Election Day disaster this fall.rtr1q2or.jpg

“Either congressional Republicans are going to chart a bold course of real change or they are going to suffer decisive losses this November,” Gingrich wrote on Tuesday in HumanEvents.com, a leading conservative voice.

Gingrich, who helped Republicans win control of the House for the first time in 40 years in 1994, is now a commentator who likes to give his party unsolicited advice.

Gingrich says the Republican loss in the special election in Louisiana’s sixth congressional district this past weekend should be “a sharp wake up call” for party members.

Gingrich noted President George W. Bush carried the district by 19 percentage points in winning reelection in 2004. In the end, Democratic State Rep. Donald Cazayoux defeated Republican Woody Jenkins. Republicans tried to cast Cazayoux a liberal by comparing him to Democratic presidential hopeful Barack Obama, but voters didn’t seem to buy it.

The former Georgia lawmaker also pointed to polls that show Americans now favor Democrats on a host of issues, including taxes and the war on terrorism.

Gingrich said House Republicans should instruct their leader, John Boehner, to come up with a plan for “real change” within a few weeks. He made a number of suggestions, including repealing the gas tax this summer and paying for it by cutting federal spending.

In response, Boehner spokesman Michael Steel said his boss agrees that the party “can only succeed this year by being agents of change and reform.”

“In the coming weeks, we will be laying out Republican policies that embody the sort of changes we need,” Steel said.  

Click here for more Reuters 2008 campaign coverage

- Photo credit: Reuters/Mark Avery (file photo)     

Comments
17 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Dear Mr. and Mrs. Reader…

Mr. Gingrich is correct…but a day late and a dollar short.

He should have been making his rounds in 1996, 2000 and 2004.

As Lord Elrond so succinctly put it, “The time of the elves is over.”

That just about says it for the republicans too.

Best Regards,
Oklahoma Jack

P.S. Mr. Gingrich has been pushing for Mrs. Clinton to be the democrat nominee for some time now. Like her, he was blindsided by the coming of Barack Obama.

Posted by Oklahoma Jack | Report as abusive
 

Ditto to “OK Jack”!

PPS “OK Jack”: The Goppers showed themselves to be just as currupt, incompetent, and pathetic as the Damnocrants when they had control of Congress, and poor ol’ Georgie Boy Bush has shown that he can’t win a war any better than LBJ (Maybe it’s something in the Texas water, or Mad-Steer disease; let’s not elect another Texas President, OK? They’re too expensive.)

Posted by Huntsville Hannah | Report as abusive
 

Republicans need to throw the neocons and their anti-American agenda under the bus, to use the phrase du jour. When it’s painfully obvious that most Americans are in some kind of financial difficulty, it’s tough to get us to support the interests of big business above our own. There is nothing conservative about neocons; they are radical corporatists, and they should NOT be anywhere near the helm of our ship of state. We live under a government of laws, not of men, and especially not moneyed men. There are problems in both parties, but neoconservatism is cancer, and needs to be eradicated from the halls of power.

Posted by Dave's Not Here | Report as abusive
 

Here is the guy that got his party to pledge his ‘contract on America’ back in ’94. He won not because of his grandstanding, but because Americans did not care for the new ‘gun control’ legislation that Sen Schumer was going to propose and Pres Clinton would have signed. Over fifty representatives, all liberals slavering to dispossess legal gun owners of their civil rights, were defeated. The monopoly press never publicly acknowledged the huge defeat that the gun control lobby suffered in 1994 until it had to several years later. Of course baby ‘Newt took all the credit. He always was a better history prof than a politician. However this time his words will be prophetic. Americans hate inconvenience with a capital H, and four dollar gasoline and heating fuel is one H of an inconvenience. For every dime that gas is over two bucks a gallon on election day and the months leading up to it, the GOP will lose ten million votes.

Posted by nuther reader | Report as abusive
 

Republicans favor corporations (or anyone with money) over truth & justice. Republican is an synonym for special privilege (depending on how much you anted up).
The “surge” (read GREED is good) that started with Reagan is over. Americans now know the truth about Republicans.

Posted by Joe | Report as abusive
 

This is hillarious. The Republicans get a candidate in Ron Paul who has one of the largest grass roots movements in recent history pushing for change within the Republican party and he is shunned. The party goes out of its way to prevent these new people that are excited to help get the Republican party back on track from coming into the party.

Too bad no one has figured out the Democrates are just as hopeless as the Republicans. They were elected en-masse in 2006 to change our current state of affairs and all they have done was followed Bush’s every order.

Posted by Bob Jefferson | Report as abusive
 

How can the party in control for 8 years now run on a platform of change? Change from what, their own policies?

Most problems the electorate are concerned with are the Republicans fault. I’ll enjoy watching the spin if the republican party tries to set itself up as the party of change and blame economic/diplomatic woes on the dems. I wouldn’t put that kind of blatant lie past them.

Posted by aaron | Report as abusive
 

Newt?

real CHANGE…

well sorry to inform you..but Obama has that covered.

Obama 08

Posted by PaigeinPhilly | Report as abusive
 

The entire political scene has become one of, by and for the wealthy, bankers and corporations.
Our government no longer represents the “people” of this nation.
Perhaps people should read the Declaration of Independence and note especially the reason for “throwing off” an existing government.
If what we have doesn’t qualify for being thrown off and replaced then I don’t know what would.

Posted by Dave | Report as abusive
 

Looks as if Newt fell on his own sword.Thumbing his nose at Democrats in 1994 when Republicans became the majority party in Congress.In so doing he thumbed his nose at half of America.2008 will show what that brings. Obama 08

Posted by william kelley | Report as abusive
 

Gingrich is correct. The Republicans are going to be ejected en mass in Nov 08. However, just because the message is right lets not forget the character of the messenger Gingrich is a caustic, divisive politician of similar nature to Hillary Clinton.

America does not need divisive mouth pieces like the Clintons, Gingrich, Fox news, RushL etc…. These sorts should be banned from politics and public speaking. Furthermore, America can do without incompetent cabals formed by George Bush, Dick, and the neocon corrupt fringe. They have destroyed the very fabric and soul of America in the past 7 years.

The time has come to restore America to a competent, kinder, gentler nation. The time has come for Obama.

Posted by Steve | Report as abusive
 

The answer is in Ron Paul. The republicans can really move America towards great prosperity, freedom and liberty by just following his strict platform.

Posted by Gmartine | Report as abusive
 

Bob Jefferson’s comment (above) “…Republicans get a candidate in Ron Paul who has one of the largest grass roots movements in recent history pushing for change within the Republican party and he is shunned. The party goes out of its way to prevent these new people that are excited to help get the Republican party back on track from coming into the party.” is right on the mark!

Perhaps as the delegates begin sizing up the dire situation the Republicrats have created for themselves, that a promise of “4-more-years-of-Bush” McCain will DESTROY the party, that continual spending overseas (not to mention the mind-boggling entitlements at home)is bankrupting the country, maybe some of them will decide to call in sick so that Ron Paul can finally be heard by the entire nation, on the floor of the Convention, and the people will realize there is actually a choice!

To all liberty-loving Americans: read Paul’s new book, The Revolution: A Manifesto. Absolutely inspiring!

Posted by Dagny | Report as abusive
 

Gingrich is absoutely correct. The Republicans need to wake up, they have not learned the lessons of the past. We need to be aggressive and pro-active in the coming election. We need to demonstrate the danger in electing liberals/or socialist with tax agendas and nothing but new social programs.

Posted by J. R. Diaz | Report as abusive
 

Ah, McSame will sail to victory on the backs of those of us would die before they voted Obama.

Posted by rhod3856 | Report as abusive
 

Yes, the Republicans need to change with the rest of the world and get their house in order.

Just you wait until Obama comes into power though…

His socialist agenda and complete incompetence in Foreign Policy will make him the fastest revolving door in Washington history limping to finish his term.

After 4 years of Barack, the popluace will welcome the Republicans back with open arms…

Posted by NedinNY | Report as abusive
 

Why does anyone who’s not a millionaire vote GOP anyway.
You would have to be naive, stupid, or a masochist.

I guess there are a lot of American’s in that boat because I really wonder how the GOP even exists in this country.

Think of all those middle class people who thought so highly of themselves they voted GOP.

How stupid must they feel. No wonder the Democratic Voter registration is through the roof.

Posted by langx | Report as abusive
 

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