Tales from the Trail

As race winds down, are Democrats still open to both on ticket?

May 9, 2008

rtr1zkmu.jpgWASHINGTON – Democrats Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama are often described by many in the party as the dream team to recapture the White House in 2008 regardless who is atop the ticket. 

Clinton, whose presidential bid has been faltering in recent weeks, had previously hinted that she was open to the idea.  And now as Obama closes in on winning the party’s presidential nomination, he has not closed the door on Clinton as his vice presidential running mate.

If Clinton fails to mount a come-from-behind win, will her supporters be satisfied with the No. 2 spot and will Obama’s backers fear that she could hurt his chances of capturing the White House or possibly upstage him?

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Comments
7 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Upstage him? No. Hurt his chances? Yes. I know a lot of people who plan to vote for Obama but will be alienated if she is on the ticket. Many people support Barack Obama because he doesn’t take lobbyist money, and wants to change the old party politics and current political machinery in Washington. Taking Senator Clinton on the ticket goes against the change he has been touting, and looks like he didn’t really mean what he said.

Posted by Rena | Report as abusive
 

LET US NOT LOOSESIGHT OF THE BASIC,VITAL, NECESSARY AND OVERWHELMING PRIORITY OF VICTORIOUSLY ELECTING DEMOCRATS TO THE PRESIDENCY,HOUSE AND SENATE and THUS EFFECTIVELY REMOVING THE Recession minded REPUBLICANS from office

Posted by axiosaj | Report as abusive
 

I have mixed feelings about an Barack-Hillary ticket. I think her brain will be picked and she will not receive challenging projects. Just the way yous guys play women in the 9-5 arena. Personally, I feel Hillary is a far better candidate for President and Obama for Vice President because he just warmed his Illinois Senate seat. I have a great deal of difficulty accepting folks who like to run before they actually start walking well. He is not ready. Bureauracy will dizzy him because he is impatient and was born with a thin shell. Aside from this, I have never accepted his acclimation about “Change” because he has not been definitive enough about it. It is not a new approach to politicking. All politicians running for one office or another speak about change; that is the common platform. I am going to watch McCain to see just what he comes up with in the next few months if Hillary is jilted. We have a senior population here in the United States that is overlooked and maybe he will make life better for his peers. We’ll see.

Posted by Sandra Lewis | Report as abusive
 

Hillary is a snake. She is dishonest, calculating and manipulative. If Obama is truly advocating change, Hillary aint it. Obama would do far better with Edwards on the ticket. Hillary has single handedly split democratic support from black people. Even if Obama is allowed to keep his hard earned win (and it is already a done deal with the math), they will remember what Hillary did and how she did it.

This is how it will go:

If Hillary somehow ends up as the nominee, blacks will stay home and not vote at all. Hillary cannot win the White House without the black vote. Hence, she is unelectable.

If Obama puts Hillary on the ticket, people will start to mistrust Obama and question his “change” mantra. Besides that, it seems too tempting for her…if Obama were “disabled”, she would be President. I would rather vote for McCain.

Posted by American (in color) | Report as abusive
 

If Obama is smart he will distance himself from Hillary. She is a bigger liability than his minister was for him.
We haven’t forgotten the Clinton adminsitration or the embarrassment that Bill brought upon this country by his drinking and womanizing. Why would we want them back in the White House again? Hillary was no victim then either, she put up with his bad behavior during his years as President because she wanted the address again in 2008. Both Clintons suffer from Truth Deficit Disorder and I personally would not want either anywhere near the White House ever again!

Posted by L Watson | Report as abusive
 

A combined ticket is a terrible idea. Clinton as veep diminishes both candidates.

Hillary should return to the Senate, embrace being majority leader, and have a long-lasting and stellar career.

Posted by jvill | Report as abusive
 

Dear Mr. & Mrs. Reader…

I’ve put some considerable thought into the issue of Mr. Obama and Mrs. Clinton being on the same ticket this fall.

If Mr. Obama chooses Mrs. Clinton, I think that the linchpin of his campaign will simply fall out, i.e., the linchpin of Principle.

Of course, there would be those who have supported him thus far who would say that the most important thing is to get him into the Oval Office…so having Mrs. Clinton (and Mr. Clinton) tagging along would simply be “Reality Based Politics”.

On the other hand, I see a real danger that Mr. Obama would disillusion millions of people. These people would simply say to themselves that if young Barack is giving in to “Realpolitik”, then perhaps there is no hope left for them and others like them…no standard-bearer…no hope left for what they envision for America.

Personally, I think that Mr. Obama should stick with Principle. That is the linchpin that has gotten him this far. I believe that Principle will also get him over the finish line as the winner in November.

Then…if a jaded congress doesn’t get in the way of Principle, legislation that benefits all Americans will be signed into law by the new president during his first 100 days.

Good luck, Mr. Obama and “To be Determined”!

Best Regards,
Oklahoma Jack

Posted by Oklahoma Jack | Report as abusive
 

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