Tales from the Trail

Power of presidency brings in dollars for Kansas hopeful

May 29, 2008

rtx69ml.jpgBUCYRUS, Kan. – Ah, the power of the presidency on the campaign trail.

President George W. Bush swooped in on Thursday to help Kansas State Sen. Nick Jordan roughly double the amount of money he has raised for his campaign to knock off Democratic Rep. Dennis Moore.

Jordan has raised about $388,000 through the end of March according to Federal Election Commission records. That’s in contrast to the almost $1 million that four-term Moore has raised in an effort to keep his seat in a fairly moderate district that includes numerous suburbs of Kansas City.

Bush helped Jordan and the Kansas Republican Party raise at least $435,000, with the lion’s share of the money going to the candidate, according to his campaign manager Dustin Olson.

But in a sign that Bush’s low popularity ratings could be a drag on Republican candidates, the fundraiser was closed to reporters so no images of the Jordan and the president were shot. 

- Photo credit: Reuters/George Frey

Comments
One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

I just wish that one of these days that I could read an article like this and find a breakdown of just where these hundreds of thousands of dollars come from in one day or one evening.

Campaign contributions aren’t my forte.

In this case, does $435,000 mean 435 donors @ $1,000 each or 870 donors @ $500 each or 4,350 donors @ $100 each…or what? Are these pledges or cash or personal checks or Visa/MasterCard charges…or what?

And what in the world does Mr. Bush do that causes this money to “roll in”? Is it simply the magic of his presence…or what?

Lastly, just what are the demographics of this bunch of people that drops hundreds of thousands of dollars on a political candidate in such a brief period of time? Are they kind of like venture capitalists? What do they expect in return?

Jack

Posted by Jack | Report as abusive
 

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