Tales from the Trail

Obama tops McCain on executive skills test, leadership guru says

July 8, 2008

WASHINGTON – When it comes to critical leadership characteristics, Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama tops Republican rival John McCain hands down, according to a self-styled business leadership guru.

rtx7r3s.jpgJohn McKee, a founder of DirecTV who now works as an author, motivational speaker and career coach, says Obama outscores McCain when judged against 10 critical characteristics of great leaders, such as knowing what you stand for, helping others succeed, being a good listener and being honest and ethical.
 
Of the 10 leadership characterists he judged most critical, McKee said Obama outranked McCain on seven and tied him on the other three. McCain did not outrank Obama on any of the 10 measures of leadership, McKee said.
 
Here are McKee’s leadership rankings and scores. Has he got it right? How would you judge the two presidential candidates?
 
1 – Great leaders run their businesses with purpose, clearly knowing their values, goartx7ra1.jpgls and objectives. Obama beats McCain.
 
2 – Great leaders help others to succeed. Obama beats McCain.
 
3 – Great leaders give back to the community. Obama-McCain tie.
 
4 – Great leaders are willing and able to overcome daunting obstacles to achieve their goals. Obama-McCain tie.
 
5 – Great leaders are also great listeners. Obama beats McCain.
 
6 – Great leaders appreciate face-to-face dialogue. Obama beats McCain.
 
7 – Great leaders are honest and ethical. Obama beats McCain.
 
8 – Great leaders understand the difference between power and force. Obama beats McCain.
 
9 – Great leaders excel in difficult environments and get results. Obama-McCain tie.
 
10 – Great leaders continually upgrade their skills. Obama beats McCain.

Click here for more Reuters 2008 campaign coverage.

Photo credit: Top: Reuters/Tami Chappell (Obama speaks in Powder Springs, Georgia, on Tuesday). Bottom: Reuters/Jonathan Ernst (McCain addresses Latin American citizens group in Washington on Tuesday)

Comments
3 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Obama has never led or been led, he was simply a political science professor. A professor is an orator and orator is like a coach…not like leader, coach.

Posted by those-who-cannot-do_teach | Report as abusive
 

Great leaders, Mr. & Mrs. Reader, inspire me, rather than make me suspicious.

There is no way that Mr. McCain can inspire me. That’s just the way of it. He might have inspired me in 2000, but not now.

Mr. Obama can continue to inspire me by getting back on message…both ideologically and financially.

If he needs “political money” from traditional democrat fund raisers and big donors, then he’s off message financially.

If he needs “political support” from traditional democrat fund raisers and big donors, then he’s off message ideologically.

If he gets back on message, he’ll have me back…and people who think like I do, e.g., 1) foreign policy conservatives (e.g., no unnecessary foreign entanglements, e.g., Iraq, Afghanistan) and 2) domestic policy progressives (e.g., unwavering stick-to-itiveness to the Bill of Rights and to the checks & balances in the Constitution as further amended, i.e., no end runs around our rights, freedoms & privileges) and 3) loyal supporters of Our Best & Finest (i.e., the absolutely best & finest that America can possibly provide for Our active, retired, separated & honorably discharged Soldiers, Marines, Airmen, Sailors & Coasties and their Families and their Survivors).

OK Jack

 

Oh PUHLEEEASE!
Whoever came up with this analysis is braindead.

Obama is NOT ethical
Obama is NOT a leader
Obama is NOT a good listener
Obama has NOT given back to his community
Obama has NOT helped anyone succeed (excuse me, im sorry he has. he has helped the anti-american, anti-semetic lunatic raving losers in this country).

Obama was a failed community activist, did nothing in the Illinoise Senate, and did even less in the US Senate. Obama is an idiot who is nothing more than the afirmative action candidate.

Posted by steve | Report as abusive
 

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