Tales from the Trail

Cindy McCain’s wrist hurt by a campaign handshake

August 13, 2008

LIVONIA, Mich. – Republican presidential hopeful Sen. John McCain said on Wednesday that his wife, Cindy, had become the victim of an overenthusiastic
supporter.

“An individual shook her hand very vigorously at the last event we were at and she has a minor sprain,” McCain told a press conference during a day of fund-raising in this cindy.jpgbattleground state.

Cindy McCain was X-rayed at a local hospital and treated for the sprain.

Appearing beside her husband with her arm in a blue sling, she said she was absolutely fine.

“I shook hands with a very enthusiastic supporter and he got me the wrong way,” she said.

The wealthy heiress of a large Arizona beer distributorship, Cindy McCain has been described as a well-coifed presence beside her husband on the campaign trail.

Click here for more Reuters 2008 campaign coverage.

Photo credit: Reuters/Brent Smith (Cindy McCain introduces her husband in Indianapolis on Feb. 22, 2008)

Comments
4 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

This rates a mention? If McCain gets bitten by a big mosquito, does that mean the Reuters outdoors blogger gets to chronicle it?

Posted by Ted2001 | Report as abusive
 

Are you kidding me? I bet this is just another ploy by George Bush Jr. to get some PR. Have your wife fight your battles.

I have NEVER heard of someone having to have a sling from a handshake. Give me a break! There are so many people out in the real world who are in true pain, dealing with cancer, or other horrible diseases, and we have to hear about a poor little McCain wife who can’t handle a handshake. Boo-hoo!

Posted by Karen Jack | Report as abusive
 

…just an excuse to get some more prescription painkillers!

Posted by paul | Report as abusive
 

This is a great example of why there is an etiquette to handshaking. The act is not about arm wrestling or proving one’s strength. It is about cordially welcoming or acknowledging another. A solid full-hand grip and a couple of shakes is all that is necessary—don’t pump the well dry and don’t hang on for dear life. It is doubtful that one would shake the hand of a frail senior or young child the way they might someone of their own age and health.

It’s just another act intended to be thoughtful and gracious and welcoming.

Be careful out there ;-)

 

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