Tales from the Trail

Financial gloom doesn’t halt glitzy Obama fundraiser

September 16, 2008

So what does Barack Obama do after a hard day of defending the common man during the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression?
 
Throw a $28,500-a-head fundraising dinner, of course.
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Followed by a $2,500-a-head reception featuring Barbra Streisand singing a song or two.

The Democratic presidential candidate spent the day Tuesday campaigning in Colorado, where he talked to supporters about the mortgage crisis that has reshaped Wall Street and caused many people to lose their homes.
 
Speaking a day after the stock market had its worst day since 2001, he assured a rally in the Denver suburb of Golden that he understood the impact the crisis was having from Wall Street to Main Street.
 
“Jobs have disappeared, and peoples’ life savings have been put at risk. Millions of families face foreclosure, and millions more have seen their home values plummet,” he said.
 
“These are the struggles that Americans are facing. This is the pain that has now trickled up.”
 
Then he jetted off to Los Angeles Tuesday evening for a pair of glitzy fundraisers that could be the biggest for Democrats during this election cycle.
 
Republican John McCain lost no time pointing out Obama was courting the stars instead of ordinary folk. 
 
“(He) talks about siding with the people, siding with the people — just before he flies off to Hollywood for a fundraiser with Barbra Streisand and his celebrity friends,” McCain told a rally in Vienna, Ohio, a critical battleground state. “Let me tell you my friends, there’s no place I’d rather be than here with the working men and women of Ohio.”

Streisand, a Democratic activist and Oscar-winning actress and singer,  initially endorsed Hillary Clinton but has embraced Obama since he won the nomination.
 
The Illinois senator has put together a formidable fundraising machine that has attracted hundreds of thousands of small donors, pulling in $66 million in August alone. That compared with $47 million for McCain.
 
Obama’s fundraising skill prompted him to forego federal campaign financing, despite earlier pledges not to do so. That enables him to raise and spend more than he could if he accepted federal money. But it also means he has to spend more time off the campaign trail raising money.

Click here for more Reuters 2008 campaign coverage.

Photo credit: Reuters/Rick Wilking (Obama speaks in Golden, Colorado)

Comments
54 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Bad timing . . . very very bad Mr. Oh-I’m-so-close-to-the-common-man! Hello!? He’s so common that he’s hanging with the Hollywood liberals! He should have cancelled or sent a proxy…remember how the Republicans curtailed their convention because of the hurricane?! Guess what Senator Obama . . . there’s a hurricane on Wall Street and you should be hanging out on main street! Shame on you! I’m embarrassed to admit I almost voted for you! Thankfully you’ve helped me see what a stupid decision that would have been.

Posted by LFforMcCain | Report as abusive
 

The Dow crashed… He threw a party… But who wouldn’t? With guests paying $28k for the pleasure to rub elbows with him and Streisand herself singing for him – damn the Dow with S&P and NASDAQ, damn the torpedoes, the party must go on. Obama is so unstoppable now that probably only the repeat of 9/11 would stop him from flying off to the party – and even that only because it would ground all the jets, including his private jet.

Posted by Anonymous User | Report as abusive
 

What a bunch of Morons! How do you think he raises money to pay for the campaign. Of course he has to hold fund raisers! Ther are a bunch of notwits here!

Posted by John | Report as abusive
 

My bet is that that these over paid, over rated, hypocritical, idiots who paid $28k had a great time riduculing those of us who are clutching our guns and clinging to our religion? What a bunch of hateful morons posting pro Obama comments! Does anyone know if the guest list is available on line?

Posted by Joey | Report as abusive
 

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