Tales from the Trail

Dean not expected to seek another term as DNC chairman

November 10, 2008

WASHINGTON – Howard Dean seems ready to move on as chairman of the Democratic party after a successful four-year stint that included twice helping his colleagues win Congress and recapture the White House.

Dean has said he doesn’t plan to seek another term as chairman and names of potential successors have begun to surface in anticipation of his January departure, a party source said on Monday.

President-elect Barack Obama, as the party’s new leader, is expected to soon name his choice for Democratic National Committee chairman. And the DNC is expected to formally go along with Obama’s selection at its January meeting.

Dean has been chairman since 2005, a year after his failed bid for the Democratic presidential nomination.

The former Vermont governor helped Democrats win control of Congress in 2006, ending 12 years of Republican rule. And last week, Dean helped Democrats expand their majorities in both chambers of Congress, and win the White House after eight years of President George W. Bush.

- Photo credit: Reuters/Brian Snyder (Dean at the DNC Convention in Denver in August.)

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

I guess that Dean wants to get back to what he likes to do best—killing babies. I would not want to be in his shoes for any amount of money in this world.

Posted by Jeff | Report as abusive
 

Perhaps now Rahm Emanuel will be willing to admit the wisdom of the “50 state campaign” – he was Dean’s nemesis in the House. Credit where credit is due, Rahm. Dean’s own campaign was in many ways the precursor of your new boss’s in terms of growing the grassroots and raising money & support on the Internet. Everyone seems to have forgotten that now.

Posted by deanfan | Report as abusive
 

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