Tales from the Trail

Obama campaign looks for dollars to help retire DNC debt

November 10, 2008

WASHINGTON – The 2008 campaign is over and while President-elect Barack Obama shattered pretty much every fundraising record in the book, he’s still looking for a buck or two.

Obama’s campaign sent out an appeal on Monday, almost a week after the election, seeking to help retire debt incurred by the Democratic National Committee. As a thank you, the campaign offered to throw in a commemorative 2008 victory t-shirt for contributors who give $30 or more.

“The Democratic National Committee poured all of its resources into building our successful 50-state field program. And they played a crucial role in helping Barack win in unlikely states like North Carolina and Indiana. We even picked up an electoral vote in Nebraska,” said the e-mail appeal sent to millions of Obama supporters.

The DNC has about $15 million in debt to retire, according to a party official. Democrats ended up picking up 22 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, with three still too close to call. In the Senate, Democrats picked up six seats so far, with three races not yet decided.

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- Photo credit: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque (Obama on his flight to Washington to meet President George W. Bush.)

Comments
9 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Ha! Not even in the White House yet and has already spent more than he has. Yeah, ready for “change.”

Posted by BillyG | Report as abusive
 

I suppose it’s illegal for Obama to use some of the excess campaign funds to retire this debt?

If that’s the case, then I think the offer of a victory t-shirt ought to do the trick. I’d certainly want one, and a debt-free DNC will be an asset going into the 2010 midterms, where we will finally secure that 60-seat majority.

Although I will not always give money when asked (in fact, only rarely), I don’t plan to be one of Obama’s “fair weather fans.” This administration — and this democracy — only work well when the citizens get involved. President-elect Obama can count on me to pitch in where we agree, and criticise where we disagree. He should expect nothing less.

 

There is no reason why Obama campaign that has millions left over from his unprecedented raised funds cannot doll out some $15 million to DNC to retire its debt. These politicians are getting too greedy. Earlier it was Hillary Clinton and the Clinton Foundation with tons of money that wanted the voters to retire her debt and now it is DNC. In this economic terror facing folks that are losing their homes, have their utilities disconnected and being thrown out on the street, even Obama is turning his back and he expects people to buy this carp. In order to spare the tax payer the cost of this hyped up swearing in ceremony and for his own safety, he should take the oat of office at the US Capitol in a televised ceremony and latter have a privately paid for ball that the rich can pay twice the amount for each other invited gust.

He should fore go all this fanfare and get busy fixing the problems facing this nation and the needs of the people instead of playing “king”.

Posted by wine0339 | Report as abusive
 

obama won now back off.
you republicans do not matter anymore its a democrat thing why are you butting in?

Posted by aziz shamarti | Report as abusive
 

For the person who posted Nov 11, 2008 2:56am GMT.
As an American you should know that we have a freedom called Freedom of Speech. You may not agree with what other people have to say but they do have a right to voice their opinions. Republicans do matter just as much as Democrats because we live in a Democracy not a Dictatorship. Our government would not work if people did not debate and put different opinions out there, no one person or one group is 100% correct on everything.

Posted by Debra | Report as abusive
 

Will have to check on this but the DNC and the Obama campaign split the proceeds of the Joint Victory Fund they built in the last 3 months of the election.

I believe there was over 170 million raised in about 2 1/2 months and the DNC got the larger share of the proceeds.

Posted by HowAboutARealityCheck | Report as abusive
 

The ‘not a dictatorship’ and ‘free speech’ comments are quite funny. I take it you are a Bush/Cheney supporter, who has made it legal for the government to know what books I took out at the library, what websites I visit on the Internet, what organizations I belong to, what phone calls I make overseas (and probably domestic as well), all without the oversight of a court.
How long, do you think, before those powers would be used to suppress fress speech? How long once free speech is effectively suppressed before we ARE in a dictatorship?

 

Money well spent in my book. I’m happy to chip in some more for the DNC. If the RNC could trade the dozens of losses it suffered in the last 2 years for $15 million in debt they would take it in a hot minute. But as it stands, the RNC raise about $130 million more than the DNC in the last 2 years and look what they have to show for it. Their party is in a shambles. They may be great at raising money, but not so good at spending it wisely. If I were a Republican, I would be rather pissed-off with how poorly the RNC advocated for me. But then again, sometimes no amount of money can make a bad idea look like a winner.

Posted by Chris | Report as abusive
 

Peter, your assumption is incorrect. I was merely stating that the people who are blogging here should have the right to voice their opinion and not be told that they do not count. I said nothing about the Bush policies. There are checks and balances in our government and there is a limit to the number of times one can obtain the highest office for a reason. Nothing is perfect, even a government run by all Democrats would not be perfect. If you feel that this is a “dictatorship” that we live in perhaps you should go a live under one for a while so you can see what one is really like. Otherwise work with you fellow Americans to improve our policies and don’t attack others for their views.

Posted by Debra | Report as abusive
 

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