Tales from the Trail

First Draft: rough patch

February 4, 2009

The first presidential apology — “I screwed up”  — making the rounds today.

Apparently President Barack Obama does not subscribe to the rules of Gibbs in the TV drama NCIS (not to be confused with the White House spokesman also named Gibbs) who drills into his minions that saying you’re sorry is a sign of weakness.

The Daschle drama is over and there appears to be a certain sense of relief that the former health secretary nominee’s tax tribulations are not going to dominate the news for much longer.

Now Washington’s usual parlor game begins — who is Obama going to pick next?OBAMA/

Washington’s new favorite pastime, bashing executive compensation and perks, will get plenty of attention today.

 Obama set to announce at 11 a.m. a campaign to curb corporate compensation with rules limiting executive pay to $500,000 a year for companies getting taxpayer bailout funds. That’s still more than the U.S. president ‘s salary.

NBC’s “Today” show did a segment on bailout bank Wells Fargo’s planned bash in Las Vegas to reward top performers, which ended up being canceled after negative publicity.

Perhaps not a good time to gamble with the economy in the tank and Washington struggling to figure out how to make it perk up.

Obama to continue pressing Republicans to cross the divide and sign on to the economic stimulus legislation. He’s got some Republican governors on board but unfortunately they can’t vote in the Senate.

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Photo credit: Reuters/Larry Downing (Early morning shadows cast on White House)

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