Tales from the Trail

Sotomayor hearings begin, lines drawn

July 13, 2009

The political lines are drawn.

The top Democrat and Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee wasted no time in setting the battle plans for the debate over the nomination of Judge Sonia Sotomayor to become the first Hispanic justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

After all is said and done,  she is expected to be confirmed to the highest court in the United States — a lifetime appointment.

But to get there, she must listen to senator after senator talk about whether she is qualified for the job, with her family sitting behind her in the hearing room, and in full public view on televised proceedings. USA-COURT/SOTOMAYOR

Senator Patrick Leahy, committee chairman, described Sotomayor as a “success story” in which “all Americans can take pride.”

He pointed out that in past confirmation hearings, other justices were subjected to questions based on their ethnicity or religion.

Thurgood Marshall was asked whether he was prejudiced against Southern whites,  Louis Brandeis was asked about “the Jewish mind,” and a Catholic nominee (we believe Leahy was referring to Roger Taney) had to overcome an argument that his views would be dominated by the Pope.

“We are in a different era,” Leahy said. “Let no one demean this extraordinary woman.”

Senator Jeff Sessions, the ranking Republican on the committee, politely layed out his concerns about Sotomayor. And she, in turn, politely sat in her peacock blue jacket and listened to his list with a smile.

“I believe our legal system is at a dangerous crossroads,” Sessions said. He expressed concern with “this empathy standard” that President Barack Obama set in choosing his first Supreme Court nominee.

It took Senator Charles Grassley to become the first to refer to Sotomayor’s “wise Latina” comment that stirred so much controversy for weeks before the hearings began.

But perhaps Senator Lindsey Graham summed it up the best: “Unless you have a complete meltdown you’re going to get confirmed.”

There are still days to go…

For more Reuters political news, click here

Photo credit: Reuters/Jason Reed (Sotomayor greeted by Leahy and Sessions at confirmation hearing)

Comments
3 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

The republicans would do themselves a favor by not standing in the way of this nomination. There is a related post at http://iamsoannoyed.com/?page_id=588

Posted by carly | Report as abusive
 

Sotomayor can say whatever she wants this week. The fact remains she DID state that a wise Latina woman could make a better judgment than a white male. What else could that mean? As far as I’m concerned, she can backpeddle all she wants this week to get the job; but I truly believe she meant the statement exactly as we all interpreted it originally. Unfortunately, the present gov (Obama, Nancy Pelosi, etc) lie and justify it later. It is what it is. 2010 & 2012 can’t come soon enough!

Posted by B Syvertsen | Report as abusive
 

as someone who lived through a similar time in political history when a ultra leftist government came to power with a similar socialist mandate,there are unbelievable parallels.i stated before the bankruptcy of GM in a posting that the unions would because of their support for obama receive preferential treatment.the nomination of a activist judge is a minor event incommensurable,as high unemployment will causes the obama regime to crumble.the next prediction ,the census that will be organized by acorn will proclaim that unlike what we thought the high unemployment figures are totally false,and are not in middle double digit figures but only half that,watch for this development.these events will be a rallying point for a resurgent of personal freedom again, allowing people work and maintain the prosperity that we are used to.

Posted by brian lee | Report as abusive
 

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