Tales from the Trail

The First Draft: Gripes and Goblins

October 30, 2009

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton griping about Pakistan while in Pakistan. PAKISTAN USA/

She says it was “hard to believe” that no one in Pakistan’s government knew where al Qaeda leaders were hiding. She talked about her tough talk in a series of morning television interviews, and said on CNN “trust is a two-way street.”

Top military brass coming over to the White House this afternoon. President Barack Obama meets with the military Joint Chiefs of Staff on Afghanistan and Pakistan this afternoon in the Situation Room (so you know it’s important).

Vice President Joe Biden and Defense Secretary Robert Gates are also down to attend the meeting where they are all expected to go over recommendations on troop strength and strategy.

No definitive word yet on when Obama will issue his decision on a new U.S. strategy on Afghanistan, so the waiting continues…

On the economic front, consumer spending fell in September and sentiment turned gloomier, underscoring the fragile nature of the economic recovery, while signs emerged that manufacturing activity may be picking up.

And it’s Halloween weekend so there will be plenty of ghosts and goblins out on the streets, may all your spirits be friendly ones…

Click here for more Reuters political coverage

Photo credit: Reuters/pool (Clinton in Lahore, Pakistan, on Oct. 29)

Comments
5 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Pakistani leaders will have to cooperate fully with Hillary Clinton if they want America to succeed in its war against al Qaeda and the Taliban. Pakistani intelligence should have a good idea where militants are hiding. Are they afraid of stirring the ‘hornets nest’ of terrorism? They should provide more information to the Americans especially when the Americans are sacrificing so much to make the area safer in the long run! It is a baffling situation.

 

For all the good work of PA against militants in S. Waziristan, Afghanistan-Taliban remains an anomaly in US-Pak relationship. Pakistan does not view Afghanistan-Taliban as an enemy yet. So Afghanistan-Taliban is not the common enemy of US & Pak yet, and this particular Taliban was the problem and friend of Pakistan before 9/11 when this Taliban, Pak and A-Q were all friends. This has to change before Americans make an exit. Otherwise, the situation will be back to pre-9/11 days.

Posted by rajeev | Report as abusive
 

of course pakistani officials know the whereabouts of al-aqaeda and its affiliates but they are not doing anything to liquidate the threat because they want to monetarily milk the US of billions of dollars for their own personal gains.they are a very shrewd bunch of smooth operators.the US must establish a stealth network of operatives in this poverty-stricken land and bypass the pakistani government and carry out its objectives through a secret private army if it wants to achieve any results.

Posted by jamshid | Report as abusive
 

She didn’t say something new! Pakistani Army officials had confessed on CNN that they can arrange direct talks between Taliban/AQ top leaders and US. Obviously Pakistanis are in contact with Taliban/AQ top leaders.

Official: Pakistan can help broker U.S.-Taliban talks
http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiapcf/07  /10/pakistan.taliban.omar/index.html#cn nSTCVideo

Pakistanis have been playing double game since long. It’s time to liquidate all liars and terrorists.

Posted by Smith | Report as abusive
 

Just like in Iraq, the Pakistanis won’t rat out their Muslim brothers and expect to escape the wrath of Allah. Until the Weatern powers understand Islamic thinking they will never win a war in the Middle East if they expect the aid of the locals.

Posted by Matt Anderson | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/