Latest on crasher-gate: will they accept House invite?

November 30, 2009

OBAMA-INDIAIt’s not quite the glamorous soiree they attended at the White House, but the party-crashing duo has been invited to a different Washington function.

Will they RSVP and accept the invitation? No one knows.

House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson plans to hold a hearing on Thursday about the breach of security at the White House last week when Michaele and Tareq Salahi crashed the State Dinner for the Indian prime minister and hobnobbed with President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden.

“The Committee plans to invite testimony from Mr. and Mrs. Salahi, who managed to attend portions of the State Dinner without proper White House and Secret Service clearance,” a statement from Thompson said. OBAMA-DINNER/SECURITY

Michaele Salahi has flirty, flirty, photos from the White House dinner on her Facebook page — cosy with the Veep, leaning toward Rahm (Emanuel, who  she mistags as “Ron” on one picture), hanging with the Marines.

And she touched the president, grasping Obama’s hand in both of hers in the receiving line.

So will the couple who is the talk of the town show up at the House hearing?

A House aide tells us that the Salahis have been contacted but the committee has not yet received a response. It was also pointed out that if they decline the invitation, Committee rules provide the option of a subpoena.

The publicity-seeking couple has not appeared in a public forum since the incident.

Of course, the hearing is on the serious issue of the White House security breach. The director of the Secret Service is also being invited — he will certainly accept.

What would you ask the Salahis if you were a member of the committee?

This time at least they will get their own seat…

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Photo credit: Reuters/Jason Reed (giant tent set up for State Dinner at White House), Reuters/official White House photo (Obama greets Salahi at State Dinner)

One comment

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I would ask them if they know the balloon people from Colorado