Tales from the Trail

McCain praises Palin…but calls her “irrelevant”

December 7, 2009

How’s this for faint praise?

Former Repubican presidential nominee  John McCain talked up Sarah Palin — his 2008 vice presidential USA/partner — on Sunday, saying she had earned an important place in the Republican party.

But he also called the former Alaska governor ”irrelevant.”

Huh?

“I think that Sarah Palin … has earned herself a very big place in the Republican political scene,” McCain said on the NBC program “Meet the Press.”

“I am entertained every time I see these people attack her and attack her and attack her.  She’s irrelevant, but they continue to attack her.  I am so proud of her and the work that she is doing,” he said.

Right.

McCain said he had a good relationship with Palin and her husband, Todd. They saw each other recently, he said.

Perhaps he left out the “irrelevant” comment at that meeting…

For more Reuters political news, click here.

Photo credit: Reuters/Mike Theiler (Palin at book-signing event in Fairfax, Virginia)

Comments
7 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Well said Senator.

Posted by emh | Report as abusive
 

Re Sarah Palin: You media guys really doth protest too much. I’d bet you’re afraid that the voters are finally seeing through your hero Obama and are looking for someone – anyone! – who speaks sense. Remember what they said about Harry Truman – everybody hated him but the people. However unlikely, it may be the same about Ms Palin, too.

Posted by Gotthardbahn | Report as abusive
 

Clever. As Sarah Palin can only further fracture the rebuplican party by magnifying her profile, I think Senator McCain is looking to marginalize her, on the one hand, and yet tie her to the Republican party on the other. Dismiss and claim: he’s speaking out of both sides of his mouth at the same time. The decades in DC are showing, a consummate politician.

Posted by Soothsayer | Report as abusive
 

To be fair, McCain’s comment has been misunderstood and taken out of context. McCain was implying that Palin’s critics are both saying she is irrelevant and at the same time spending lots of energy attacking her. McCain is not the best speaker when the questions and answers are not rehearsed beforehand.

Posted by getplaning | Report as abusive
 

Uh, for all of you folks out there that say that Ms. Palin: 1) makes sense, 2) has common sense, and, 3) has values, would any of you kindly like to explain, in terms that have any semblance of real meaning, just exactly what you all mean by those terms? And please, don’t give me this “Real Americans” junk. I would hope that, if we are here in America (illegals not-withstandng), that we’re pretty much all real Americans. I feel like whenever I hear this person speak she sounds like a Republican talking point without any substance – just the standard mayonnaise. I am a registered Independent so don’t claim that I’m another one of those “liberal, conservative bashing,
socialists. I just have a hard time seeing what her supporters see in her. If you “just like her” well then say so. I think there are people on the left that attack her for all kinds of reasons, but some of us in the middle don’t care for her because she appears, in my opinion, to have little or no substance.

Posted by Timmer | Report as abusive
 

McCain is wrong, Palin is highly relevant for having cost him the 2008 election. With any other running-mate but Palin — anyone — he would have won handily. Why he chose her is still a mystery to me.

Posted by moebadderman | Report as abusive
 

A recent poll showed that 53% of Republicans would like to see Sarah Palin to run for President in 2012.

That same poll also showed that 100% of Democrats would like to see that too. :)

Posted by mjdehm | Report as abusive
 

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