Tales from the Trail

Obama’s tweets hit milestone, but Ashton is the twitterer-in-chief

January 5, 2010

President Barack Obama may be the leader of the free world, but actor Ashton Kutcher is the king of twitter and pop princess Britney Spears is, USA/OBAMAer, its princess.

 Obama’s twitter feed recently attracted its 3 millionth follower, which was announced with this tweet — “As we kick off 2010, our Twitter community has grown to over 3 million. I continue to be grateful for your partnership as we work for change” — on Monday afternoon.

The development made Obama’s feed — actually run by the Democratic Party’s National Committee — only the fourth ever to garner such attention. But he still remains far behind the leaders, the Hill newspaper noted on its “Twitter Room” blog.  They each have 4 million followers, the blog said, citing TwitterCounter .  

The top three twitter feeds are those of Kutcher, pop’s Britney Spears  and the U.S. comedian and talkshow host Ellen DeGeneres. 

USA/Of course, Kutcher sends his own tweets, of which he wrote: ”I make stuff, actually I make up stuff, stories mostly, collaborations of thoughts, dreams and actions. Thats me.” Recent samples of Kutcher’s missives — which can be up to 140 characters long — include a link to a “sick” snowboarding video, a short thank you note to his vacation (“Dear, Vacation You were amazing. Thank you, Ashton.”) and the observation “Hung over yoga hurts.”

Obama’s are less colorful. Recent tweets include a link to his address on the botched Christmas Day airplane bombing attack, best wishes to everyone celebrating Kwanzaa and Christmas and the notice on Dec. 24 that the Senate had just passed healthcare reform.

The president also admitted recently that he has actually never twittered.  In November, during his trip to China, Obama told a group of Chinese students, ”My thumbs are too clumsy to type in things on the phone,” he said.

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Photo credit: Actor Ashton Kutcher reads responses to his tweets to promote volunteerism during the Entertainment Industry Foundation press conference in New York, September 10, 2009.  REUTERS/Brendan McDermid and U.S. President Barack Obama is pictured wearing his Blackberry communications device as he watches as his youngest daughter Sasha play soccer at the Boys and Girls club in Washington May 16, 2009. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Comments
5 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Obama’s comment to his tweet peeps was interesting.

In what way exactly, have they helped as partners in working for change?

For that matter, in what way has Obama helped in working for change?

I think Obama has some real milestones to watch out for. It’s hard to hide what you haven’t done.

Posted by Anon86 | Report as abusive
 

Many American voters were hoping Obama might roar against injustice, war and corruption, such that he would actually do something about these things like he promised. Instead, he has been far too busy caving in to the Dark Side, bit by compromising bit.

What remains to be expected of this Presidency? Tweet F-all.

Posted by HBC | Report as abusive
 

Perhaps we were expecting a “Jacksonian Revolution.” Obana has disappointed catering or caving on health care. I don’t get it. Why did the insurance companies’ stocks go up when the Senate passed its version of reform? Perhaps Obama realized as he stated that health care industry was fundamentally broken and should be scrapped not reworked. Perhaps, he was afraid of being a one term president. Either way, he has lost support. Perhaps, my hopes for him were too high. He doesn’t have the courage or leadership of an FDR or TR.

Posted by JanyRegina | Report as abusive
 

Obama is a cipher. He is the cardboard cutout for a leftist organization called the Tides Foundation.

Posted by AtlasWillShrug | Report as abusive
 

Atlas- How about loosening the straps on that aluminum hat?

Posted by Yellow105 | Report as abusive
 

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