Tales from the Trail

White House becomes playground for annual Easter Egg Roll

April 5, 2010

Never mind nuclear arms treaties, unemployment figures, or healthcare debates. The big news at the White House on Monday was the Easter Egg Roll.

OBAMA/President Barack Obama and his family joined scores of kids and camera-toting parents for the annual event, which, in addition to the ritual tossing of eggs with spoons, featured soccer, tennis and basketball games as part of first lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” campaign to fight childhood obesity.

“Today we have transformed the South Lawn into a playground,” Mrs. Obama told the crowd before joining the festivities.

“We’re going to have 30,000 people in our backyard today, and we want every single one of you to have fun, to think about living a healthy life, and to get moving,” she said.

Did you catch that number? Thirty thousand is a lot of folks to have in a backyard.

The president played referee to some of them, blowing the whistle for one group of kids engaged in getting their eggs from a “start” spot on the lawn to the finish line.

“Everybody stay in their lane!” he admonished playfully.

The basketball playing commander-in-chief then joined another group of kids on the White House basketball court to shoot hoops, missing two three-pointers but sending a final shot that “swished” before he left for his other presidential duties.

Photo credit: Reuters/Jason Reed (Obama family listend to national anthem with Easter Bunny during 2010 Easter Egg Roll at White House)

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Obama can be a really fun guy when he lets his hair down

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