Tales from the Trail

Obama swipes at “just say no crowd”

July 30, 2010

President Barack Obama in Detroit demonstrated what is sure to become a familiar theme in the run up to the November elections — Democrats painting Republicans with variations on the ”Party of No.”

OBAMA/Obama patted his policies on the back for keeping automobile jobs and plants open in Michigan — a state hard hit by the recession — and struck out at Republicans for standing in the way of progress.

In defending his handling of the auto industry crisis, Obama said some of the automobile jobs and plants would not have held on if it weren’t for the controversial government bailouts.

“We’ve got a long way to go, but we’re beginning to see some of these tough decisions pay off.  We are moving forward,” he said. “If some folks had their way, none of this would have been happening.  Just want to point that out, right?  I mean … this plant and your jobs might not exist.”

“There were leaders of the “Just Say No” crowd in Washington. They were saying, oh, standing by the auto industry would guarantee failure,” Obama said.

“They don’t like admitting when I do the right thing.  But they might have had to admit it.” (Probably shouldn’t hold your breath waiting for that Mr. President).

Meanwhile another Democrat is making news for throwing a fit late Thursday about Republicans blocking legislation.

New York Congressman Anthony Weiner expressed wild, finger-pointing, arm-waving outrage over Republican opposition to legislation to pay for healthcare for 9/11 rescue workers who fell ill from working the ruins of the World Trade Center.

“It is a shame, a shame!” he screamed:

With three months left until Nov. 2 elections there will be plenty more opportunities for Democrats and Republicans to scream at each other…

Photo credit: Reuters/Larry Downing (Obama gets in to drive a Volt car off the assembly line at GM plant in Michigan)

Comments
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It’s been pretty unpleasant watching the Senate lately. The DISCLOSE Act came up, and every single Senate Republican joined together to block the bill from even getting a vote. A package of incentives and tax breaks for small businesses looked to be in good shape, but every single Senate Republican joined together to knock that down, too. Twenty obviously qualified judicial nominees were brought forward, and again the GOP blocked votes on all of them. Medical care for 9/11 victims came up, and Republicans prevented it from passing, too.

The House has been trying to re-open the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund through 2031 for 9/11 responders whose health has been affected. When it became apparent that the Republicans were going to attach “poison pill” amendments to the bill that had nothing to do with 9/11 and everything to do with their political agenda, Democrats shut down the possibility of amending the bill by moving it to the suspension calendar, where a minimum 2/3rds vote is needed for it to pass.

So to review, the Democrats bring a bill to the floor to pay the debt this country has to 9/11 responders, but the Republicans wanted to add something that involves illegal immigration, so that Democrats will look like they voted against illegal immigration when they were voting on a bill to take care of 9/11 responders.

There’s only one reasonable conclusion to draw: Republicans don’t believe it’s right to care for 9/11 responders. They think it would be better for those responders to have to go to court, evidently because they might die before receiving a settlement to help them with their health problems. And when they do go to court, count on these same Republicans to start banging the table about frivolous lawsuits and TORT reform.

Posted by Yellow105 | Report as abusive
 

The republicans are a sad lot… the rest of the world just shakes their heads that your country attempts to show other countries how to run a democracy… errrrrmmmm…

Posted by hsvkitty | Report as abusive
 

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