Tales from the Trail

McCain hails Palin power in the mid-term elections

October 19, 2010

Arizona Senator John McCain says his former running mate former Alasaka governor Sarah Palin is a “visionary” for the United States.

“She has had a tremendous impact on this election cycle, as you well know, by supporting certain candidates,” McCain said in an interview on ABC’s “Nightline. “It is really a remarkable thing to observe.”

The 2008 Republican presidential nominee again defended his decision to pick the then relatively unknown Palin for the number-two spot on the ticket.

“I couldn’t be more proud of the campaign she waged,” he said. “I couldn’t be more proud of her or her performance and her continued performance. So, I think, you begin to think about legacy and I think that Sarah Palin will play a very big role in the American political scene for a very long time.”

Here’s more of the interview.

McCain, a war hero who ran against Barack Obama for president in 2008, has represented Arizona in the U.S.  Senate since 1986.

He handily defeated conservative challenger J.D. Hayworth in a  bitter battle for the Republican Senate nomination.

During the primary, McCain took some heat for shifting his stance on several issues, including “Don’t  Ask,  Don’t Tell” and immigration.

He told “Nightline” that he has not changed on the military’s ban on openly gay men and women serving in uniform.

But McCain conceded he had changed on immigration because he says he was following the will of American voters.  He says he shifted “frankly because the American people spoke. They want the border secure.”

Photo credit: REUTERS/Joshua Lott (McCain greets supporters at his headquarters in Phoenix)

Comments
9 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Funny, look where her visions got him!

Posted by osito3 | Report as abusive
 

This is the same Sarah Palin that cost him the election against Obama. Since then she has quit the only job she had that gave her any experience – and that was under pressure of criminal cases against her.

How does this make her a candidate for anything more than late night talk shows?

Posted by Eric.Klein | Report as abusive
 

Gov. Palin expresses the feelings and positions of a very large segment of the country. She stands for those things which are seen to be threatened by a government that has lost its way. She stands for what many in this country stand for, a government that derives its power from the governed, and to which the governed now want that power returned. She is the voice of a mighty force among this country’s people.

Posted by Whitefield | Report as abusive
 

You’re a senile, babbling old man McCain that is a poster child for term limits. It would be best if you keep your mouth shut and ride the wave of ignorance that got you here.

Posted by mynamehear2 | Report as abusive
 

Amazing! I’m a Republican, but I can’t imagine ANYONE, other than another non-visionary (McCain), saying Palin is a visionary. McCain was a terrible nomination for the Republican candidate in 2008 and made the biggest political blunder imaginable when he selected Palin as his running mate. If there were any real alternative, other than the pitiful Democratic party, I would convert! If McCain and Palin truly had any love for the USA and truly didn’t want the Democrats to continue controlling every branch of government, they would stay under the radar. Their comments are perfect soundbites for what’s wrong with the Republican Party!

Posted by rwethereyet | Report as abusive
 

As a liberal lefty, I used to respect McCain as a resonable centrist. Maybe that is why he’s moved to the right. He does not want folks such as me to view him favorably anymore, because that means he is foresaking his consertavite roots/base.

As for Palin, it boggles the mind that someone as ill-equipped as her can wink her way to the top of the political heap. Just when we thought it couldn’t get worse than George W. Bush, here comes George W. Bush in a skirt. I guess republicans have completely given up on running candidates who can speak the queen’s English or who have read more books than they’ve written.

Posted by mcoleman | Report as abusive
 

Some good points mcoleman, however I think Palin might be more accurately compared to Obama in a skirt. At least Bush didn’t spend 90% of his time blaming other people for his failures, nor did he socialize our country. I’ll take Bush’s more common language skills over that smooth talking, do nothing career public employee we now call our President!

Posted by rwethereyet | Report as abusive
 

It’s one thing to get up on a soap box and echo the concerns and sentiments of a majority of American’s. It’s something all together difference to have the skills and a realistic plan to actualize those ideas. Sarah Palin does not have the skills nor does she have a plan that we can all examine and verify. All she does is talk. We already have a truck load of politicians that offer little more than lip service. As far as John McCain is concerned, I will vote for whoever runs runs against this charlatan. Even if it’s Bugs Bunny.

Posted by xyz2055 | Report as abusive
 

I have often wondered if he picked Palin simply so the Repubs could lose and then blame the Dems for all the problems.

He might have had my vote if he had picked any other candidate than the seemingly delusional quitter from Alaska. Every time I hear her speak I wince at the number of people who claim to be followers. I have got to believe that they either are not truely listening to her, or are for anyone who is anti-Obama (a movement that started even before he was elected).

Worship at her “alter” makes me truely fear for the American that I have faithfully served while I was in the Army.

Posted by Robert76 | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/