Tales from the Trail

Obama tweaks Republicans at governors lunch

February 28, 2011

President Obama leaped into political frays on a whole bunch of different levels when he addressed state governors at a White House luncheon.

Of singular interest was his mention of Republican Mitt Romney, a potential 2012 presidential candidate who is OBAMA/spending time these days defending the healthcare overhaul he executed as governor of Massachusetts.

The plan has been criticized by Romney’s potential 2012 rivals as little different from the Obama plan that Republicans want to repeal.

Obama got into it by saying he wants states to have flexibility under the healthcare law.

“In fact, I agree with Mitt Romney, who recently said he’s proud of what he accomplished on health care in Massachusetts and supports giving states the power to determine their own health care solutions. He’s right. Alabama is not going to have exactly the same needs as Massachusetts or California or North Dakota,” he said.

Then there was Obama’s tweaking of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, a Republican seeking to roll back collective bargaining rights for state employees in his state. Walker was not at the lunch.

“I don’t think it does anybody any good when public employees are denigrated or vilified or their rights are infringed upon. We need to attract the best and the brightest to public service,” he said.

In the audience were at least two potential challengers to Obama in 2012: Mississippi’s Republican governor, Haley Barbour and Indiana’s Republican governor, Mitch Daniels. Also there was New Jersey’s Republican governor, Chris Christie, who has made various speeches around the country lately saying he is not going to run in 2012.

Obama seemed to look at Barbour when he said:

“I hope today, all of you, feel free to make yourselves at home. For those of you with a particular interest in the next election, I don’t mean that literally,” he said.

For more Reuters political news, click here.

Photo credit: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque (Obama reflected in a mirror as he addresses state governors at the White House)

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Are we ignoring the political nightmare health care will be for Obama in 2012?!

2012 is the year we get the Socialist(s) out of the White House! No more mass murderer Mao ornaments on the White House Christmas tree after 2012. No more Socialist health care programs (in contrast to Romney’s free market approach.) No more union bosses as number one visitors to the White House whose call to action is the final line of The Communist Manifesto: “Workers of the world unite!”

If the two bills really are the same, and Obama is not simply being disingenuous in his compliments, why was Romney’s bill about 80 pages and Obama’s about 2,800?

How similar can the two bills be, REALLY? Even if the 80 pages are a carbon copy, the Obamacrats have stuffed an extra 2,720 pages of taxation and redistribution of wealth somewhere in there…

I’m sure Romney will face attacks from both the left and right, but I think America is smart enough to figure out the difference between a free market Republican who promises to repeal ObamaCare and a Socialist President who pretends to emulate RomneyCare, yet never actually solicited his advice.

Meanwhile, can so-called Christians like Huckabee ignore the obvious massive differences between ObamaCare and RomneyCare for personal/political gain while still staying Christians? Don’t the Ten Commandments include a provision against bearing false witness?

We obviously don’t hold Obama to such high moral codes, however… (As either Romney or Huckabee.) Lying and misleading for personal/political gain should not affect him or reflect poorly on the country he is voraciously “leading” into obscurity and debt. Should they, Mr. President?

In 2012 I will vote for the candidate who represents hope for the jobs of America, and the children and grandchildren who will need them, Mitt Romney.

Posted by JedMM | Report as abusive
 

oOOOo

Posted by Infiltrator | Report as abusive
 

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