Tales from the Trail

Democrats hit Romney on “Band-Aid” comment

December 5, 2011

By Jason McLure

Even as Newt Gingrich has soared to the top of most Republican presidential polls, Democrats continue to focus their attacks on former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney. Today New Hampshire and Iowa Democrats unveiled a new website attacking Romney for calling the president’s jobs bill a “temporary little band aid” during a debate in October.

Democrats say passing the jobs bill, which would extend a payroll tax cut for employees, would save the average family $1,500 next year – or “four months of groceries, over seven months of gasoline, an electric bill for an entire year,” according to a video on the site, littlebandaids.com.

It also takes a swipe at Romney’s wealth, estimated to be around $250 million, with the line “$1,500 might be a Band-Aid to Mitt Romney, but to a middle-class family, $1,500 goes a long way.”

As part of the effort, President Obama’s re-election campaign also released a new online tax calculator allowing people to compute how much money the extension would save them.

“President Obama’s failed policies have devastated millions of Americans with record jobs loss and record home loss, and that is why he is looking at a one-term proposition,” said Andrea Saul, a Romney spokesperson.

Polls show Romney trailing Gingrich in both Iowa and South Carolina, though he retains a wide lead in the most recent Republican poll in New Hampshire.

The NBC News/Marist poll taken Nov. 30 gave Romney 38 percent to Gingrich’s 23 percent among likely New Hampshire voters. It also showed Romney leading President Obama 46 percent to 43 percent in a general election matchup in the Granite State, with Obama defeating Gingrich 49 percent to 39 percent.

Here’s the video, via littlebandaids.com:

Photo Credit: REUTERS/Jim Young

Comments
One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

I only make about $40k a year. I’ll take a band-aid, especially seeing as how I paid for it to begin with.

Posted by 4ngry4merican | Report as abusive
 

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