Tales from the Trail

Romney identified as ‘progressive’ in 2002 interview

December 14, 2011

YouTube just has no love for Mitt Romney. In a newly surfaced video circulating online, Romney is shown telling a television reporter during his 2002 campaign for Massachusetts governor that he sees himself as “moderate” and “progressive” — labels most candidates in this year’s Republican primary have tried to avoid. At least one of Romney’s rivals, Jon Huntsman — whom many consider to be the only other moderate in the Republican race — is sending the video to reporters.

In the clip, Romney is shown telling a reporter:

“I think people recognize that I’m not a partisan Republican, that I’m someone who is moderate and my views are progressive, and that I’m going to go to work for our senior citizens, for people that have been left behind, for urban schools that are not doing the right job, and so they’re going to vote for me regardless of the party label.”

Here’s the video; Romney’s comments begin at the 0:40 mark:

YouTube Preview Image

Credit: Akaczynski1/YouTube

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

It’s a sad, sad commentary on the state of American politics when being seen as a “moderate” and a “progressive” are a bad thing. I guess moderation and progress are ideals the Republican party stands firmly against.

Posted by 4ngry4merican | Report as abusive
 

“Moderation” AND “Progessivism” are both a bad thing because they are code words for “Infantilism” and “Socialism” – of traditional that is, the triumph of the collective State over traditional American individual liberty – and there are too many moderates and progressives in both the Democratic and Republican parties.
A Real American would reject compromise and seek the return to Founding Principles.

Posted by merlin1246 | Report as abusive
 

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