Tales from the Trail

Romney unveils happy ad for TV, goes negative on the web

December 29, 2011

Mitt Romney’s campaign is out with a new, upbeat television ad in Iowa extolling “the American ideals of economic freedom and opportunity.” The video weaves together farm imagery and a soaring voice-over by Romney, who says that “the principles that made this nation a great and powerful leader in the world have not lost their meaning”:

“When generations of immigrants looked up and saw the Statue of Liberty for the first time, one thing they knew beyond any doubt, and that is they were coming to a place where anything was possible. That in America, their children would have a better life”

Meanwhile, his campaign issued a new web video targeting President Obama that coincided with Romney’s visit to Davenport, Iowa, yesterday, four years after Obama visited the Mississippi River city as a candidate. “It is time for this pessimistic president to step aside and let American optimism that built this greatest nation on earth, build a greater future for our children,” Romney says in the video.

Behind the scenes, the Romney campaign continued to go negative on Gingrich, blasting reporters a lengthy opposition sheet highlighting Gingrich’s support for 1990s spending bills that contained earmarks. A quote from Romney spokeswoman Andrea Saul highlights the line of attack:

“A lot of things have changed since 1998, but Newt Gingrich’s unreliable fiscal leadership is not one of them. Thirteen years ago, Speaker Gingrich derided fiscal conservatives as the ‘perfectionist caucus’ and ‘petty dictators’ while he backed a massive spending bill cheered by Democrats and the Clinton White House. Weeks later, when House conservatives decided a new leader was needed, Speaker Gingrich called them ‘cannibals.’ That is not the type of leader Republicans are looking for in 2012.”

Watch Romney’s sunny new ad, “Freedom and Opportunity”:

Romney’s “Davenport, Four Years Later” web ad:

Credits: mittromney/YouTube

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