Tales from the Trail

Rick Santorum: birth control ruling has nothing to do with women’s rights

February 10, 2012

Forcing religious organizations to provide contraceptives has nothing to do with women’s rights, Republican presidential contender and vocal Catholic Rick Santorum said on Thursday.

The comment aligned Santorum with a lineup of conservative critics bashing Democratic President Barack Obama’s rule requiring religious institutions — but not churches — to provide health insurance plans that cover birth control.

The rule, announced in January, covers religious-affiliated groups like charities, hospitals and universities. The Catholic Church opposes most methods of birth control and conservatives have painted the rule as an attack on religious freedom from a secular president.

Speaking to CNN’s John King, the former Pennsylvania senator said: “That’s the Church’s money, and forcing them to do something that they think is a grievous moral wrong. How can that be a right of a woman? That has nothing to do with the right of a woman.”

Santorum bills himself as the only true conservative in the field of Republicans vying to win their party’s nomination to challenge Obama in November. He’s backed by evangelical leaders and social conservatives who admire his consistent and at times polemical stances on abortion and gay marriage. He swept nominating contests Minnesota, Missouri and Colorado on Tuesday buoyed by votes from social conservatives.

Better than expected economic news and the administration’s move, which was initially viewed as a score for women’s health advocates, have shifted the conversation of an election that most believed would be centered on the economy.

Conservative heavyweights including  House  Speaker John Boehner, Senate Republican Leader  Mitch McConnell, Texas Governor Rick Perry and presidential candidate Newt Gingrich have all warned of an attack on religious freedom coming from the White House. Obama also risks losing the votes of Catholics of whom he won 54 percent in 2008.  On Thursday, the administration back-pedalled from its position, promising room for compromise but the groundwork for the attacks seems to have been laid.

“No, a woman’s right to free contraceptive coverage being covered by someone who believes it’s a grievous moral wrong is not trumping that constitutional right of freedom of religion,” Santorum said.

Photo credit: REUTERS/Rick Wilking ( Santorum at an energy summit at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, Colorado)

Comments
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Nothing to do with women’s rights. OK…so since this is about what would be good for the Catholic Church it would also be good for Islamic business that want to institue Sharia Law within their business. That would be the exact same as it’s Islam’s money and forcing them to do somehting that they think is a grievous moral wrong is ok with Santorum.

Posted by NewsDebbie | Report as abusive
 

Many existing laws and regulations apply specifically to pregnant women. Several provisions of the Affordable Care Act offer new benefits for expecting mothers. Search online for “Penny Medical” if you need affordable insurance for yourself or your wife.

Posted by JeffryK | Report as abusive
 

Some churches believe blood transfusions are morally wrong, some believe psychology is wrong, some believe all physical ailments should be cured with prayer alone. None of them have any business getting involved with health care.

Contraception is not a contraversial issue; 98% of catholics use it. The church is already trying to amend their rules because millions of their faithful in africa are slowly dying of AIDs while they preach about the evils of condoms. The more the church fights on this issue, the more they reveal themselves to be anachronistic and irrelevant. Declining membership and revenues will ultimately force them to make an awkward concession.

Posted by spall78 | Report as abusive
 

CAN WE JUST PUT THIS NUT BACK IN HIS BOX??

In an interview with CNN’s Piers Morgan, Santorum proclaimed that when a woman becomes pregnant after being raped, she has a duty to keep the child.

The former Pennsylvania Senator said the victim should not get an abortion, but instead welcome their “horrible gift from God.”

Santorum phrases being raped as “women in such a position.” He goes on to justify that having a baby after rape as “making the best out of bad situation.”

Santorum’s thinking on this is skewed; he’s coming off like being raped is the woman’s fault: ‘Well she was in that position, so she’d better make the most of that bad situation.’

This isn’t the first time Santorum’s exclamations have gotten him in trouble this election season. While campaigning in Iowa he told a group of supporters:

“I don’t want to make black people’s lives better by giving them somebody else’s money; I want to give them the opportunity to go out and earn the money.”
Read more: http://globalgrind.com/node/824820#ixzz1 m0xgbhKT

Posted by JonesArmyMom | Report as abusive
 

I can’t believe that the Catholic Church is still pushing the birth control issue after all these years. As an individual that was raised Catholic, I remember the many changes that have taken place through the years, in order to stop the decline in membership. The Catholic Church has changed it rules regarding divorce and remarriage. Newt Gingrich’s conversion to Catholicism and marriage in the Catholic church certainly is an example of that. So I do see a change in their contraceptive ban, but not before this election. I believe the bishops want anyone but Obama, but would love to get Santorum elected. There are too many empty seats at Mass these days, and they claim that the money is not being contributed to run and maintain the churches.

Posted by ypat | Report as abusive
 

what a scumbag.

Posted by MetalHead8 | Report as abusive
 

what a scumbag.

Posted by MetalHead8 | Report as abusive
 

How’s this for an attack on the church? I want to remove their tax-exempt status. If they want to involve themselves in politics rather than focusing on their stated mission to save souls, thar’s just fine with me. Let’s tax them. On any given Sunday, and this holds true for the mega-fundamentalist churches more than any, most of the “sermon” is instruction on the joys of the Republican Party and the tragedy of allowing the Democrates to grant more freedoms to more people who don’t happen to hold with the Conservative Rights oppressive social agenda. Fine but that’s not the reasons given to justify tax-exemption. I am so sick of the churches duplicity and wonder what Christ thinks about their message of exclusion and ill-disguised Hate.

Posted by 1066ad | Report as abusive
 

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